Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 47th Global Nursing & Healthcare Conference London, UK.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Ayfer Karadakovan

Ege University, Turkey

Keynote: Development, maintenance and protection of elderly health

Time : 10:00-10:30

Nursing Global 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ayfer Karadakovan photo
Biography:

She graduated from Ege University School of Nursing in 1980. Ege University completed his master's degree in Institute of Health Sciences1984 and her doctorate in 1989. In 1995 he became a doctor of Internal Medicine Nursing, and in 2001 he received her professorship title. She served as the Director of Ödemiş Health High School of Ege University between 2008 and 2012, and as the dean of Ege University Faculty of Nursing between the years 2013-2016. She is the founding member of Association of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Nurses, Association of Oncology Nurses, Society of Neurological Nurses, Association of Turkish Nurses, EDTNA / ERCA, Founder member of Aegean Geriatric Society, Turkish Geriatric Foundation (2008-2009 Board Member) and Geriatric Nursing Association. 16 graduate students, 7 doctoral students have been counseled and their education has been terminated. She currently conducts consultations with 6 PhDs and 2 MSc students. She has been an executive in nine EU-funded projects. She has received 5 awards from scientific studies. SCI & SSCI & Arts and Humanities, 85 articles published in other fictional magazines, numerous reports presented at congresses, chapter writings in an international book, chapter author in 32 books. Nervous System Diseases and Nursing Care, Chemotherapy Nursing (Protection and Care Standards), Elderly Health and Care. Internal and Surgical Care, Neurological Sciences Nursing. She has been the translator of books on the Elderly Care Nursing books. She is a faculty member of the Department of Nursing, Department of Internal Medicine, Nursing Faculty of Ege University. She is married and a boy's mother. 

Abstract:

When the medical, social, cultural, legal and ethical dimensions of aging are taken into consideration, it is important to develop, maintain and protect health so that societies can better serve older people and sustain their quality of life. Healthy lifestyles will be possible only through the application and maintenance of healthy lifestyle habits not only in old age but throughout life. For this reason, it is important to raise public awareness about the proper management of healthy living habits, control and maintenance of health care. This is the responsibility of health professionals, educators, social scientists and other professionals. In this context, it is necessary to implement initiatives aimed at grasping and applying the concept of active aging.

Active aging

It can be defined as the "active aging" process in which people get the best out of opportunities to improve quality of life throughout their lives and apply their initiatives. The active word defines the continuity of the individual's social, economic, cultural, spiritual and individual involvement in events. At the end of the 1990s, the World Health Organization (WHO) defined what needs to be done to improve health by using the concept of "active aging". The World Health Organization defines active aging as the process of maximizing the opportunities for health, participation and security for these people in order to improve the quality of life as people age. More broadly, "active aging" can be defined as the highest level of possibilities for sustaining health, raising and maintaining the highest quality of life, lower levels of disability and dependence, self-sufficiency, and maintaining and sustaining a safe environment.

  • Nursing Practice
Speaker
Biography:

Monette recently completed her Doctor in Nursing Practice from American Sentinel University in Aurora, Colorado with a focus on Executive leadership. She is currently the director of a 30 bed heart failure unit at Moses Cone Memorial Hospital, a 500 bed acute care hospital that is a part of a 6 hospital enterprise in southeastern North Carolina. She has presented numerous evidence based posters to various national nursing conferences including the American Nurses association and the American Association of Critical Care Nurses.

Abstract:

Reducing hospital readmission for heart failure patients is a major focus for healthcare organizations to improve quality and reduce cost, following Center for Medicare and Medicaid rule to lower reimbursement to hospitals with increased readmissions for heart attack, heart failure and pneumonia. Advance community paramedicine program is an innovative approach to reducing hospital readmission by employing paramedics to conduct follow up visits to high risk heart failure patients. This quantitative non-experimental before and after comparative study of a single group using retrospective data of high risk heart failure patients. This study will attempt to establish statistically significant relationship between the advance community paramedicine program and heart failure patient’s readmission rate and address questions by describing correlation and causation based on objective measurement and observations (Hammer & Collinson, 2004). A non-probability convenience sample of approximately 100 records on patients, who were admitted to a heart failure unit before and after the community paramedicine program were implemented, will be retrieved from the electronic health system. Data will be analyzed using IBM SPSS version 23.0. Descriptive statistics will be used to describe the characteristics of the patients and the Chi-square, a non-parametric test will be used to analyze the variables that are measured on a categorical level (Kim & Mallory, 2014).

Speaker
Biography:

Zafar Mehdi has completed his PhD in 2015 from the Department of Gerontology, University of Vechta, Germany, Masters’ in sociology, university of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan and Masters’ in Demography from ANU Australia and diploma in Public Health from University of Saskatchewan, Canada.  He has been teaching social sciences in Pakistan and Canada for many years.  At present, Mr. Mehdi is working as an assistant professor of social sciences at Dhofar University Oman (Middle East). He has published several papers at reputed National and International Journals. 

Abstract:

There are mandatory and volunteer further training programs in health care and long-term care sectors in Canada. The relations between further training of care workers and quality of patient care in hospitals, home care settings and residential care facilities are unclear.  The study investigates the association between further training and care workers staffing (nurses, elderly carers and care assistants) on the elderly health situation, work situation, and quality of patient care in Canada. Cross-sectional data were drawn from 2010, Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) 2010, and Canadian National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (2005) for the analysis.  Findings reveal that additional training of care workers has a positive association with work situation and quality of patient care as in reduction of injury, infection, medication error, and satisfaction.  Likewise, staffing level among elderly health workers has a strong relation with lower injuries, lower medication errors, lower Nosocomial infection and increased satisfaction.  The implication of the study suggests a greater role and staffing of health workers and professional development programs to improve the quality of life of elderly. 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: In 2016, approximately 163,087 new Registered Nurses (RNs) were licensed in the United States. Of these, over a quarter will leave their first position in less than a year. While 90% of academic leaders feel newly graduated nurses are ready for nursing practice, only 10% of clinical leaders agree. In the past, research has focused on the new RN after a year or more of practice without addressing the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes required to ensure timely and successful orientation and a strong start to the new career.  It is possible that recent changes in health care, increased emphasis on health maintenance, an intensifying theory-practice gap and an educational tradition distinguished by content overload mean that Nurse Educators may be preparing new RNs who are not equipped for the fast-paced orientation and increased accountability that come with the new RN role.

Purpose: This qualitative study seeks to answer the question: What do hiring nurse managers and hospital educators perceive as required competencies of newly licensed nurses (NLNs) to ensure successful and safe progress through orientation periods? The aim is to assist nursing education professionals to focus on competencies that are needed to ensure a solid foundation and effective orientation of newly licensed nurses.

Theoretical Foundation: This study draws on Patricia Benner’s “Novice to Expert” theory. Specifically, it seeks to identify those competencies in which newly licensed nurses should be at the advanced beginner stage if not approaching the competent stage at graduation.

Method: Semi-structured interviews lasting about an hour each were conducted with hiring nurse managers and hospital based nurse educators responsible for hiring and orienting newly licensed nurses. Recorded interviews were then transcribed and analyzed using ATLAS TI software. Themes were identified and knowledge, skills and attitudes were ranked by frequency of occurrence both generally and by unit type.

Results: In Progress

Conclusion: In Progress

Speaker
Biography:

Marina Calleja-Reina has completed his PhD at the age of 30 years from Málaga University School of Psychology. She is the co-reseach in several research projects (national and international scope). She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

It is normal for people to have sufficient resources to be able to carry out communicative exchanges, among which the ability to speak as a fundamental means of transmitting communication stands out. However, sometimes there are certain circumstances that make some people have little or no possibility of using speech to carry out the communicative exchanges. In this case we refer to the people affected as people with "Complex Communication Needs" (CCN)

Due to the difficulty or inability to use speech as a natural means of communication, people with CCN will need to resort to systems or strategies of Augmentative and Alternative Communication to carry out communicative exchanges.

EC + is an application (henceforth app) free of charge whose purpose is to increase functional communicative competence in people with Intellectual Disability. It is a downloadable app on mobile phones and tablets and its purpose is to serve as an AAC device with a high technological level. With this app we have tried to alleviate some of the disadvantages that we have detected in the use of AAC devices. The first to be free and available for phones and tablets both Android and IOS can be used by a large number of users. On the other hand, given that it has been designed taking into account the needs of the specific population, people with ID and their interlocutors (habitual or punctual).

Speaker
Biography:

Director of Nursing at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Allen with oversight of inpatient, Behaviral Health and Emergency Department. Graduate from Lehman College-City University of New York and attended University of Phoenix’s online MBA, MSN/HCM program, graduating in 2007 with this dual degree. Member of several cross-campus initiatives on quality and patient safety and received the Relationship Based Care and Clinical Excellence Leadership Awards.  I am an exam writer for The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Institute’s new CPXP exam and have also obtained CPXP certification. I encourage my teams to learn and explore the cultural norms and within the context of healthcare.

Abstract:

In our  ever changing landscape of healthcare, we are in a constant race to balance value based purchasing, with the patient experience and employee engagement. Here at The Allen Hospital, we embarked on a journey of continuous quality improvement that first relies aon several key feedback loops in order to be successful in how we approach both improving quality indicators and patient satisfaction. Through several “Deep Dive” events, we were able to (and continue), to gather interprofessioanl teams (MD, RN, Nursing Support Staff, Environmental Services, Laboratory, Materials Management, IT, Pharmacy, Food & Nutrition, Talent Development, Operations, Nurse Administrators, Quality Dept) who brain storm together for an all day event. The Deep Dive gives the opportunity to create innovative , practical and sustainable  solutions that align with both the organizational vision and mission. Through the use of this technique, we are able to:

·         Review current state (define the problem and review data related to the problem statement)

·         Brain storm on solutions by emerging themes

·         Action plan around suggestions

·         Create process oweners for sustainability

·         Reveiw of outcome metrics

·         What’s working well and what do we need to modify?

·         Most of all build highly effective, engaged and agile teams

 

Many actionable and highly interactive solutions have been implemented and sustained though the use of these events. In addition to improving the patient and employee experience, Deep Dives give us the opportunity to get to a granualar level of problem solving. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. M. M. Madumo completed her PhD (Nursing Sciences) from the University of Limpopo Medunsa Campus in 2014. She is a senior lecturer at Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University. She specializes in Community Health Nursing Science including Reproductive Health Care. She is also involved in teaching of the postgraduate Diploma in Occupational Health Nursing as well as supervision of postgraduate masters students. She has published 3 articles in accredited journals and has written chapters in 3 Community Health Nursing Science books. She is serving in the School Research Ethics Committee as well as the Research Publications committee of the university. 

Abstract:

The purpose of the research was to construct a programme for prevention of unplanned pregnancies in adolescent girls through emancipated decision-making. Decision making in adolescent unplanned pregnancy prevention is an important public health issue. Adolescent unplanned pregnancy, although preventable, remains common globally and is usually associated with negative health and socio-economic outcomes for the baby, adolescents themselves, the family and society. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design was followed based on the Wittmann-Price theory of emancipated decision making in women’s health care issues. The research took place in four phases: Phase 1: A situation analysis, Phase 2: The concept analysis and the conceptual framework, Phase 3: A description of the programme as well as guidelines for the implementation of the programme, Phase 4: Evaluation of the programme, limitations and recommendations. The results indicated that adolescent girls need personal knowledge, empowerment, flexible environment, the ability to reflect and awareness of social norms to be able to make emancipated decisions in preventing unplanned pregnancies. Based on the results, an emancipatory education programme for enhancing emancipated decision making in pregnancy prevention in adolescent girls was constructed. Healthcare professionals have the responsibility to practice ethically, be guided by applicable public policies on adolescent girls’ pregnancy prevention, benchmark the best practices and engage in reflective dialogue with adolescent girls and colleagues to improve the programme and practice. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr MJ Black has completed this PhD degree Doctor of Literature and Philosophy in 2017 from the University of South Africa and M Cur including a degree B Cur I et A from the Medical University of Southern Africa (Medunsa) . She completed several diplomas: Nursing Administration & Community Nursing (1996) from Medunsa. Paediatric Nursing Science: 1987; Midwifery 1984; General Nursing Science (1982) obtained with distinction from Nursing Colleges in South Africa. She presented an oral paper that got a first prize in her category. She is a lecturer and supervisor in post graduate research at Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University currently. 

Abstract:

A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory and contextual study was undertaken to explore and describe how clinic nurses practice their role regarding growth development monitoring and anthropometric measurement of children and interpretation of their values. An accessible population of twelve clinic nurses of all categories were purposively recruited to participate in the study. In depth individual interviews were conducted to generate data. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed by the researcher verbatim. The direct quotes of participants were coded and arranged into meaning units for analysis. Tech’s (1990:142-145) eight steps of analysis to analyse the textual qualitative data as cited by Creswell (2009:186) was used until themes, categories and subcategories were identified and developed. Data analysis was triangulated by using Atlas.ti computer software version 7.0 to organise text, audio data files coding, memos and findings into project files. An independent coder analysed data for validation using content analysis. Data analysis revealed that nurses had challenges in ways of doing practice evidenced by inconsistencies and discrepancies in GDM, APM of children and incorrect interpretation of their values. Non-compliance to protocols from both nurses and parents was a significant finding. Shortage of resources was reported as a major hindrance. Guidelines were formulated to guide clinic nurses. Recommendations were proposed that the matter be taken up by nurse managers, educators and leadership from the Department of Health. 

April Dobroth

Frontier Nursing University, USA

Title: Bringing mental health to primary care
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. April Dobroth serves as a regional clinical faculty member for Frontier Nursing University.  For the over six years, she has served in rural and underserved communities as a National Health Service Corp (NHSC) member and has been appointed as an ambassador for NHSC in the state of New Mexico.  Additionally, she served as a representative for primary care providers on the New Mexico Behavioral Health Coalition (NMBHC) where she worked closely with the director of Health and Human Services, the Governor Susana Martinez, and several other medical professionals in New Mexico to address the dire need for increased access to behavioral health services in the state. 

Abstract:

Access to mental health services in the United States is severely limited1.  The integration of mental health services into the primary care setting is in close alignment with the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI) triple aim to increase patient satisfaction and access to care, improved health of communities, and decrease per capita costs of care2. The purpose of this project was to examine the efficacy of a model of care that fully integrated mental health services into the primary care milieu.  Efficacy of this model of care was examined using the IHI triple aim2.  Patient satisfaction was measured utilizing the CollaboRATE tool with positive ratings ranging from 9.86-9.91/maximum 10.03.  Improved population health was measured by the number of calls received and handled by the mental health crisis team.  Reduction in the per capita cost of care was analyzed by comparing the number of crisis calls handled through the integrated model of care to local emergency room visits involving a mental health diagnosis. Over the course of the study, 44 crisis calls were diverted from the local emergency room through the program. The average cost of an emergency room visit for patients with a psychiatric diagnosis in Montezuma County Colorado was found to be $14,863 per visit.  A cost savings of $653,972 for the 44 visits handled through the integrated model of care was realized4.  Further studies are needed to effectively evaluate the integrated model of care over a period of several years and in a variety of clinical settings. 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: Adolescence is a time of enormous physical and psychological change for young females. Menstrual disturbances are not uncommon and may add further disruption to this difficult phase so this is an opportunity for clinicians to advise the adolescent on abnormal conditions related to delayed menstrual cycle and its treatment. 
Aim: To explore the habits followed among adolescents and families toward treatment for delayed menstrual cycle at puberty. 
Methods: This is a cross sectional/ Quasi-experimental.  The recruited 200 adolescent girls from two different localities: urban and rural preparatory schools in Asyut city, Egypt. 
Statistical analysis: The data were tested for normality using the Anderson-Darling test and for homogeneity variances prior to further statistical analysis. Results:  Comparison between parents’ habits based on locality revealed a statistical significant difference. Knowledge about causes of delayed menstruation among urban adolescent students revealed a statistically significant difference.

Conclusion: This study highlights an important theme of habits and knowledge about amenorrhea among adolescents and their parents. 
Clinical implications: Further research should be done to figure out the relationship between knowledge and habits related to puberty abnormalities and its management. Moreover, to provide students in the preparatory phase with a simple guidance program.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: Faculty scholarly productivity in the form of research publication consistently appreciated for its role in improving education and advancing knowledge.

Purpose:  The purpose of this study is to increase research productivity among academic staff of higher education institution.

Design: A prospective, one group pre and post-test experimental design was performed in a nonrandomized intervention group of nursing faculty members who attended a series of seminars and workshops of research. The target population comprised the 50 faculty members working in a governmental university in the eastern region of KSA during the period of 2015 and 2016.

Results: Results indicate that the difference in number of publications, web of science citations, Scopus citations, and google scholar citation after implementation of stimulating research productivity program were statistically significant.

Conclusion: Faculty members experience changes in attitude toward and intention to conduct research, as well as the number of their published research articles as the result of two-year educational interventional program on research productivity. The researchers, thus, recommend that higher education institutions, including schools of nursing and other health professions, adopt the Thomson Reuters’ intervention to accomplish the well-needed improvement in scholarly productivity, especially in the developing world, such as Middle Eastern countries. 

Speaker
Biography:

Jackie Malesela hold a PhD and works at the Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University as a Midwifery lecturer. She has published 4 papers in accredited journals and has been serving as a reviewer in 3 journals. 

Abstract:

The purpose was to describe a model to facilitate best practice during intrapartum care. A contextual, qualitative, explorative, descriptive research design for theory generation has been used. The study consist of four phases: Phase One focuses on exploration and description of the meaning of the concept ‘best practice’ during intrapartum care. The results thereof were used to direct data collection during the empirical phase. Phase Two explores the perceptions of midwives regarding how best practice can be facilitated during intrapartum care. A non-probability, purposive sampling method was used to select a sample of registered midwives willing to participate in three sessions of semi-structured agenda-focused group interviews. Data saturation occurred during the third agenda-focused group interview session. A qualitative method was used to analyse data. An independent co-coder was involved in data analysis followed by a consensus discussion meeting between the researcher and the co-coder to finalise the findings. The findings in phase two include values and ethical practice; enabling environment, introspection, and needs analysis; effective and efficient clinical practice; professionalism/regulatory framework; and strong leadership and clinical governance. The researcher held a follow-up interview to verify the findings. The trustworthiness was ensured and the ethical principles were adhered to throughout the study. Phase three involve conceptualisation of the findings. Phase four describes and evaluates the model followed by a description of the guidelines to operationalise the model. The original contribution of the study is justified, limitations and the recommendations are made. The concept of best practice during intrapartum care is cyclical in nature and is continuously evolving. 

Speaker
Biography:

Pamela Fonju is a Family Nurse Practitioner and earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree from William Paterson University. She is the Regional Administrator for the Department of Children and Families where she oversees the health care needs of over 500 children within an assigned Geographic region. Dr. Fonju is also an adjunct professor of nursing at William Paterson University.  Dr. Fonju has provided numerous presentations on her most passionate interest: hypertension and diabetes. Dr. Fonju is professionally associated with Sigma Theta Tau International; American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American Academy of Nursing Leaders, and Project Smile.

Abstract:

Background - Hypertension is a primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, premature morbidity and mortality worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates a global prevalence of approximately 1 billion and project and increase to 1.7 billion by 2025. Global hypertension increase has been attributed to steady increase in developing countries. The use of anti-hypertensive medications have been shown to produce significant gains however non-adherence remains a global health problem. This study examines factors associated with medication adherence among hypertensive adults in the North West Regions of Cameroon.

Methods - Descriptive cross-sectional survey design; data collected by self-administered questionnaires. A convenience sample of established patients in two hospitals. Patients who presented for regular visits were administered 2 surveys: Demographic variables (15 items) and approved Morisky medication adherence questionnaire - Cronbach alpha .83 (Morisky et. al. 2007). 

Results - Sample (n=200): (47%, n = 94) reported a normal blood pressure. Mean systolic blood pressure: 141mm/Hg and diastolic blood pressure was 85mm/Hg. Mean adherence score was 6.33, SD=2.089. 31% (n = 63)- low adherence, 32%  (n= 64 ) medium adherence and 36% high adherence. A weak negative correlation was found in systolic BP(r(198) = -.204, p<.01) and in Diastolic BP (r(198) = -.237, p<.01).

  Conclusions - The long-term reduction strategy of acute cardiovascular events associated with high medication adherence to antihypertensive treatment underscores its importance to hypertension control.  Efforts focused on early antihypertensive treatment initiation and customized intervention programs may likely improve patient outcome and provide major benefits in global hypertension control efforts

Speaker
Biography:

Bihter Akın has been working as a midwife in the maternity unit for about 15 years and continues her Ph.D. education. There are published many articles and book chapters on birth, birth pain, prenatal education.

Abstract:

Recently, nonpharmacological methods have been used as well as pharmacological agents in the management of birth pain. Labor dance  is a combination of many nonpharmacologic methods. The research has been conducted to determine the effects of labor dance on perceived birth pain, birth satisfaction and neonatal outcomes. The data were collected during the active phase of labor as three groups; Midwife Dance Group (MDG) (40 pregnants), Spouse/Partner Dance Group (SDG) (40 pregnants) and Control Group (CG) (80 pregnants). In Midwife Dance Group, the midwives who are in charge of the in delivery room and following the pregnancy; in the Spouse/Partner Dance Group, spouse/partners have danced with pregnant during the active phase (dance with a RELAXING/slight/gentle musical accompaniment, wrapped around partner's shoulders, swinging to the right and to the left). For the control group, only routine practices/treatments were implemented in the hospital. In all three groups, perinatal birth pain, birth weight, newborn 1st, 5th and 10th minute Apgar score and oxygen saturation levels were compared.  Pain score was lower in Dance Groups than Control Group, 5th minute Apgar score, 5th and 10th minute oxygen saturation level and birth satisfaction score were significantly higher than the Control Group. There is a positive effect on the birth pain, birth satisfaction and neonatal outcomes of the labor dance performed with the spouse or midwife in the intrapartum period. For effective management of birth pain the family should be included in the intrapartum period. Midwife, pregnant and family should act in cooperation.

Nataly Lazarovitch

Sheba Tel Hashomer Medical Center, Israel

Title: Nursing care: Aspect in treatment ECMO patients
Speaker
Biography:

My name is Nataly lazarovitch, I was completed my MA before 2 years from Tel Aviv University.  At last 8 years I am working in intensive care cardiac surgery Sheba medical Center and two last years I am Deputy Head Nurse in ICU Cardiac Surgery.

Abstract:

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a complex and expensive technology that can be used to provide temporary support during respiratory and heart (or bough) failure. Two cases of critically ill patients who received ECMO  using different forms of circuitry and for different indications and presented. Both patients had life-threating problems with shock and were not able to be supported by conventional means. We discuss the expanding indications for this technology and the role it has to play in our intensive care nursing management. We find a number of important managerial and policy implications regarding technological adoption, like ECMO, specialization in this professional domain, and the quality of interaction nursing team.  Focuses on the process of decision making in managing the care of ECMO clients experiencing critical conditions that are life threatening and/or involve multiple body systems and multiple machine system.  Complex medical-surgical-nursing conditions in intensive care units are discussed in terms of pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatments that are based on current research and experience over the years

  • Posters

Session Introduction

Gemma Umali

New York Presbyterian Hospital, USA

Title: The Use of Aromatherapy to Decrease Pain & Nausea in Medical/Surgical Patients
Speaker
Biography:

Gemma Umali BSN RN completed her Bachelor Degree of Nursing from Pines City College in the Phillipines and is also currently a Clinical Nurse III on a general medical surgical unit at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Allen Hospital. 

Abstract:

Background:

Aromatherapy has been shown to have positive effects on several different aspects of pain managment and well being. This project was initiated as a way to improve pain management on a general medical/surgical unit  in conjunction with opiate pain management. Aromatherapy therapy tabs were offered to patients with sickle cell/general pain, nausea/vomiting and a post survey about the patient’s experience was conducted to determine effectiveness. Lavender-Sandalwood for relaxation, comfort, sleep, pain relief. Orange-Peppermint uplifts, energizes, and can soothe queasiness and was used for nausea/vomiting patients.

Results:

97% of all other patients with pain reported it helped them to relax and feel comfort.

All nausea and vomiting patients reported it helped them to relax and feel comfort.

85% of nausea and vomiting patients reported it helped soothe queasiness.

25% of staff survey reported it made their job easier.

We measured one data point prior to the intervention and in pain management score (PMS) was 45.5%

The (PMS) improved to 77.5% then 50% respectively then 100% in the post intervention periods still showing improvement from the initial score of 45.5%

With the implementation of the aromatherapy as an adjunct to pain management we noted an improvement in pain scores from the initial to present which reflects the impact this project had on the patients’ experience. Although it did not totally help relieve pain for the majority of our patients, it helped in other areas such as sleep, relaxation and comfort.

Speaker
Biography:

Yoon completed her PhD in 2005 from Keimyung University in Korea and has served as an assistant professor in Hanil University since 2014. She is a hospice specialist, giving consultation in various hospital settings and community care organizations. She has published papers in peer-reviewed journals regarding hospice, spiritual nursing and program development for Korean nursing students.

Abstract:

This study was to present education and holistic care of Elizabeth J. Shepping (1880~1934), a nursing missionary and a founder of the Chosun Nursing Association who visited Korea during the Japanese colonial period. Primary and secondary sources were collected and analyzed. This study provides important implications regarding Shepping’s holistic nursing as follows: First, she came to Korea after studying nursing and bibliology and being trained for nursing missionary works. Second, she cared for many Koreans, especially Korean women, to protect them from poverty, oppression, ignorance, and illnesses. Third, she continued to spread holistic care in hospitals and other local communities. She trained nurses, developed nursing education, and produced a large number of domestic nursing leaders by establishing women’s Bible school. Fourth, she founded the Chosun Nursing Association, serving as its first president for 10 years and applied to join the International Council of Nurses (ICN). Finally, suggestions were provided for future research, and it will be necessary to study thoroughly nursing achievements by nurses from other countries who practiced their nursing activities in Korea, and such studies are expected to lead to analysis of nursing missionaries’ experiences.

Speaker
Biography:

Kåre Karlsson completed his MSc in 2009 from Borås University, and has worked in the ambulance service in Skaraborg hospital, Sweden for 33 years. He is a specialist nurse in the prehospital field. He is also a PhD student at half-time at Jönköping University. He has published 2 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Background

Previous research has shown that paramedics are exposed to risks in the form of injuries to the musculoskeletal system and they are over-represented in terms of cardiovascular disease, cancer and psychiatric diseases, partly explained by exposure to stress. The aim of this study was to see if the use the of shoulder straps decreases physical effort in the form of decreased heart rate and cortisol concentration.

Methods

 A stretcher with a dummy was carried by 20 participants 400 metres on two occasions, one with and one without shoulder straps and cortisol samples were taken at intervals of 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes and heart rate was monitored continuously. Each participant was her or his own control.

Results

 A significant decrease in both heart rate and cortisol concentration were seen when shoulder straps were used. Median for women at 0 minutes 85/23.3  (heart rate/cortisol concentration), 15 minutes 92/20.8, and 60 minutes 70/18.4 and without shoulder straps at 0 minutes 84/32.4, 15 minutes 100/32.5, and 60 minutes75/25.2. For men, the results were 78/21.1, 85/16.9, 76/15.7 and 78/21.9, 93/21.9, 73/20.5, respectively.

Conclusions

The use of shoulder straps decreases measurable physical stress and should therefore be implemented when heavy equipment or a stretcher need to be carried. To ensure this, shoulder straps should be personal or alternatively be sewn into alarm jackets. 

Speaker
Biography:

Patrik Niemelä completed his MSc in 2009 from Borås University, and has worked in the ambulance service in Skaraborg hospital, Sweden for 11 years. He is a specialist nurse in the prehospital field. He has published 2 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Background

 According to previous research, ambulance personnel often experience themselves as healthy, but at the same time several studies show that they suffer from a number of stress-related illnesses, take early retirement and even suffer early death. The aim of this study has been to examine mental stress during priority-1 alarms.

Methods

During 91 priority-1 alarms heart rate and salivary cortisol concentrations were measured. During priority-1 alarms salivary cortisol was collected on two occasions, at alarm and after end of alarm. Heart rate was measured every 15 seconds. Fourteen men and six women (sixteen ambulance nurses and four paramedics) participated. A questionnaire with background data was collected.

Results

 Elevated heart rate was associated with priority-1 alarms. When comparing individual alarms and different participants, there are clear differences in heart rate and cortisol response.  There was no tolerance development for heart rate response. Alarms concerning traffic accidents, fast track and children seemed to generate the highest stress response. There was no significant difference in stress regarding personnel’s age, gender, level of education or point in time for alarms.

Conclusions

 Predefined fast track schedules and traffic accidents appear to generate stress among staff. Since no correlation could be seen between heart rate and salivary cortisol concentration they cannot replace each other as indicators of stress.  

Yuki Ohtsuyama

Hokkaido University of Science , Japan

Title: Ageism among nurses in japan : A literature review
Speaker
Biography:

Yuki Ohtsuyama, an assistant proffesor, has worked with the elderly for many years in clinical environments. Her personal experiences lead to her interest in research on elderly abuse and how it can be better identified by nurses. After graduating with a BSN in 2008, Yuki began clinical work with patients as an RN in a surgical ward specializing in respiratory medicine, and orthopedic and gastrointestinal surgery. She continued work as a nurse both in an emergency room and in a nursing home while working to achieve her MSN. She graduated with a specialization in gerontology in 2014.

Abstract:

TOPIC: The population of the elderly is increasing rapidly in Japan. Nurses need to become more conscious of elderlu abuse. Ageism may affect the ability of nurses to discover elderly abuse.

PURPOSE:To Review literature concerning ageism among nurses in japan.

SOURCES: Selected published nursing literature 2001 to 2016 on Japan Medical Abstracts society.

RESULT: There were 22 articles, 2 of them were about ageism of nurses and care givers who work in nursing homes. All the other articles were about ageism of nursing students or educations of ageism in nursing schools. According to several authors (Kukihara,2012; Sano,2010;Tanaka,2007), education and experiences of associating with elderly people effects ageism. However there wasn’t any articles about ageism of nurses in general hospitals.

CONCLUSIONS: Researching ageism of nurses in general hospitals is a matter of great urgency.

Speaker
Biography:

Michiyo Yamamoto has completed her PhD from Sapporo Medical University. Her major was public health and she studied about end-of-life care of older adults. She is a teacher of the gerontrogical nursing at Hokkaido University of Science from 2013. She has been research for aged skin, end-of-life care, and interprofessional educatio. (Up to 100 words)     
 

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to clarify the changes in the stratum corneum hydration compared to temperature and air humidity.The subjects of this research were fifty-eight older adults. The researches were conducted in March and May of 2017. A self-administered questionnaire was consisted demographic data, frequency of taking a bath, nutritional status (MNA® SF) and condition of xerosis cutis. The stratum corneum hydration was measured on the center forearm by Mobile Moisture HP10-N®. Data was analyzed for gender, age, frequency of taking a bath and nutritional status to examine differences in stratum corneum hydration. Later differences of the stratum corneum hydration data obtained in March and May were examined.The results of this research displayed thirty-two female subjects (55.2%), thirty-five subjects under seventy-five years old (60.3%), twenty-eight subjects who took a bath every day or almost every day (48.3%), twelve subjects at risk of malnutrition (20.7%) and eight subjects with rough skin (13.8%). There was no significant difference recognized in the stratum corneum hydration regarding gender, age, frequency of taking a bath or nutritional status. At the time of research in March and May, the temperature was 24.9±0.4 ℃ and 24.4±0.4 ℃ (p>0.001), respectively, and the air humidity was 29.8±1.3% and 47.3±3.6% (p>0.001), respectively. The stratum corneum hydration in March and May was 41.6±8.5 (minimum value, 22.0; maximum value, 59.7) and 50.3±9.0 (minimum value, 34.0; maximum value, 72.0) (p>0.001) respectively.The stratum corneum hydration was significantly low in low humid environments.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Widespread contamination of arsenic in Bangladesh has been jeopardizing the health of millions of people. This cross sectional study was done to assess the level of knowledge awareness and practice regarding arsenicosis among the community health care providers of Bangladesh in four Districts . 210 ommunity health care providers were interviewed by a structured questionnaire
and were selected using purposive sampling. The study period was January 2014 to December 2014.
Result:
This study suggests that refresher training will help them increase knowledge, awareness and practice about arsenicosis.. The study revealed that 69% of respondents had knowledge about arsenic while 31% did not know about arsenic. The study showed that all (100%) respondents said that red labeled tube well cannot be used for cooking and drinking and green labeled tube
well can be used for this purpose. Most (90%) respondents practiced to advice arsenicosis patients to avoid drinking the red mark tube well water. Regarding practice of medication in pregnant women, 52.3% respondents advised patients not to take Vitamin A,E and C, while 47.7% respondents advised to take these vitamins. Concerning practice of arsenic kit test, all (100%) respondents did not know how to operate arsenic kit test.respondents advised patients not
to take Vitamin A,E and C, while 47.7% respondents advised to take these vitamins. Concerning practice of arsenic kit test, all (100%) respondents did not know how to operate arsenic kit test.

Speaker
Biography:

Chi Ping Chang has completed his PhD at the age of 48 years from National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Science. She is the Associate Professor, Dep  of Nursing, Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology. She has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute. 

Abstract:

With advances in information technology, the e-portfolio focusing on individualized learning, reflection, and self-management has received positive attention, and the nursing profession has adopted e-portfolio to nursing education. This study based on technology acceptance model 2 explores the needs and perceptions of graduate student nurses regarding the use of e-portfolio in the Last Mile Practicum Course (LMPC). Five focus groups comprising ten to twelve student volunteers participated. The focused interview data was analysed through content analyses aimed at evaluating the perceptions of e-portfolio. The results revealed four key research themes: (1) anticipated functions achieved, (2) ease of uploading data and showcasing learning results (3) functionality extensions to enhance mobile learning, and (4) policy guidelines and plagiarism prevention. Majority of students identified that the e-portfolio system must facilitate positive rapport between nursing students and instructors, while establishing clear internship goals. The system should provide a user-friendly and stable system function for data upload. The e-learning content should be linked with the teaching system used by the practicum hospital, and offer additional functionality. The mobile versions of the e-portfolio technology should be developed to increase accessibility. User policy guideline for teachers and students as well as antiplagiarism measures should be implemented. E-portfolio assists in integrating knowledge, skills, and achievement recognition into the learning process. The nursing students’ suggestions for e-portfolio include: a user friendly/useful system and a policy of use and antiplagiarism to promote adoption of e-portfolios. This enables students learning their clinical competency for future nursing practice in the LMPC.

W. C. WONG

The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Title: Stigma towards Dementia in Asian Cities: A Literature Review
Speaker
Biography:

Ms. W. C. Wong is the Assistant Professor (Division of Nursing and Health Studies) of The Open University of Hong Kong. She is a Registered Nurse and Registered Psychiatric Nurse. She had worked in several different clinical areas, including acute care unit and psychiatric unit before joining the university. Her research interests include mental health nursing and caregivers’ needs. 

Abstract:

The Open University of Hong Kong, Division of Nursing and Health Studies, School of Science and Technology, Hong Kong SAR Background: With the rise of ageing population, dementia population will soar in the coming decades in Asia. Western studies stated that dementia patients always suffered from stigma; thus they hesitate to seek diagnosis until late stage. Despite the prevalence of dementia, studies concerning the stigma of these people are lack in Asia. Purpose: This article aims to review stigma towards dementia in Asian cities. Method: Criteria were set for searching among published studies listed in various databases, including MEDLINE, CINCAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest, and Springer Link. Asian articles investigated the stigma of dementia were included. Articles with the words “dementia”, “Alzheimer’s disease”, “stigma”, “perception”, “attitude”, “stereotype”, “label” in titles and abstracts were identified. Articles with all types of research designs and methods, regardless of whether in English or Chinese, were included. Articles are limited to year between January 2007 and August 2017. Results: Of the five articles included in this study, four were conducted in Hong Kong and one was from Japan; one was editorial, one was commentary, two was survey and one was cross-sectional study. Samples were recruited from community. Authors proclaimed that stigma on dementia patients were strong in Asian cities. Older people and people who rarely contacted dementia patients inclined to have stronger stigmatization. In addition, higher level of stigma associated with lower care seeking intention. Conclusion: Studies concerning stigma on dementia patients were insufficient in Asian countries. More studies should be conducted to explore condition of stigmatization, so strategies to reduce stigma can be established.