Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 47th Global Nursing & Healthcare Conference London, UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Lin Zhan

University of Memphis, USA

Keynote: Leading with Courage and Wisdom
Nursing Global 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lin Zhan photo
Biography:

Dr. Zhan received her PhD degree from Boston College (1993), MA, USA. Dr. Zhan has been a Chief Academic Officer/Dean of Nursing near 10 years. Currently, she is the Dean and Tenured Professor at Loewen berg College of Nursing, University of Memphis, a metropolitan public research university in Tennessee, USA. In 2001 , Dr. Zhan inducted to be a Fellow of American Academy of Nursing (FAAN) for her extraordinary leadership and significant impacts in nursing. Dr. Zhan has published over 100 articles, 6 edited books, and conducted over $SM funded research. Currently, Dr. Zhan serves on the Board of Directors for tl1e American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Dr. Zhan has received numerous regional, national, and international awards for her excellence in education, scholarship, and leadership.

Abstract:

Rapid changes have taken place in American higher education. The public expects higher education to be academically and socially responsible and accountable. Funding for higher education especially in public universities is limited. Changed student populations reguire new ways of higher education by taking advantage of a rapidly developed technology. Students expect accessible, affordable, flexible, and high guality education so that their investment in higher education would have a good return such as a career, and/ or the ability to advance their field of studies. Higher education market is becoming highly competitive as potential students desire to select universities that add values to their inves tment. These contexts/factors influence Academic Nursing. Academic Nursing encompasses the integration of practice, education, and research within baccalaureate and graduate schools/ colleges of nursing. Faculty engaged in academic nursing demonstrate a commitment to inguiry, generate new knowledge for the discipline, connect practice with education, and lead scholarly pursuit that improve health and healthcare (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2016). In healthcare, a time of uncertainty, an increase of healthcare omplexity, a shortage of nurses and primary care physicians, and challenges of healthcare finance while aging of populations coupled with chronic illnesses need coordinated, comprehensive, and affordable care. Academic Nursing leaders have to be nimble to prepare a caring, compassion, and competent nursing workforce that meets needs of an ever-changing healthcare environment. This paper will focus on how to lead with courage and wisdom as thought leaders to inspire a shared vision, execute workable strategies, seek opportunities, build academic practice partnerships, negotiate needed resources, manage uncertainties, and sustain and advance mission and goals of cademic Nursing.

Nursing Global 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker L. Jane Rosati photo
Biography:

Dr. Rosati has completed her master’s in nursing and doctorate in education from University of Phoenix in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. She is a full, tenured professor at Daytona State College School of Nursing in Daytona Beach, Florida. Dr. Rosati has been in nursing education for over 14 years. In 2016, she was inducted into the Academy of Nursing Education as a fellow. The academy is part of the National League for Nursing (NLN) in the USA. Dr. Rosati has conducted over 80+ national and international presentations on a wide-range of nursing education topics. 

Abstract:

Many nurse educators embrace the classroom learning methods of the 20th century hoping they will successfully translate for a new century of learners. This phenomenon will not happen unless educators recognize we are teaching students who embrace different learning methods. Students today have information presented to them almost instantly from multiple sources. Through just a few clicks of the mouse, they can access almost any piece of information on the World Wide Web. So, how do we teach students to harness this information so it makes sense in their nursing education? Nurse educators struggle with questions such as “how can I get students to be active in their learning” and “how can I get students to see the whole picture? This is the challenge every nurse educator must address if they desire to be successful. Helping students to put the pieces of the learning puzzle together will help with student success. Classrooms and clinical areas should contain different learning styles where students can see how multiple aspects of patient care overlaps from many sources. Bringing all the pieces of education together helps students embrace the knowledge that will make them successful in practice.    

  • Nursing Education & Research, Geriatric Nursing

Session Introduction

Linda L. Strong

Sacred Heart University, USA

Title: CARING: The cornerstone of healthy communities
Speaker
Biography:

Linda Strong received a BSN from the University of Bridgeport, an MSN from Catholic University of America in Public Health Nursing and an EdD from Teachers College Columbia University. She is the Director of the RN-BSN & RN-MSN Programs. She has more than 50 presentations and published articles. 

Abstract:

The conduction of a Community Assessment is a time-honored and standard practice in Public Health/ Public Health Nursing. A prelude to the provision of care the community assessment identifies the availability, affordability, accessibility and acceptability of a network of systems including health, education, risks and security. The second phase of the assessment asks about the function and outcomes of these systems in light of statutes, regulations, and objectives. The third phase includes recommendations for improvement, elimination of outdated programs and need for new programs. This presentation will describe the outcomes of an assessment of one of the oldest neighborhoods of the largest city in the state of Connecticut, and stated needs of the people living and working in this highly impoverished and most densely populated 1.273 square miles.  The College of Nursing at Sacred Heart University (SHU) has led an inter-disciplinary initiative with the College of Business, College of Arts and Science, College of Education and the College of Health Professions based the mission of the university “…to assist in the development of people knowledgeable of self, rooted in faith, educated in mind, compassionate in heart, responsive to social and civic obligations…” and the philosophy of College of Nursing which defines nursing as “caring with compassion, empathy, altruism with the intention of healing body, mind, spirit”.

Speaker
Biography:

Mary Alice Donius received a BSN degree from D’Youville College and MEd and EdD from Teachers College, Columbia University.  She is the Dean, College of Nursing at Sacred Heart University.  She serves on the Board of Trustees at Western Connecticut Health System and Danbury CT and ArchCare at Home in New York City.  

Abstract:

The conduction of a Community Assessment is a time-honored and standard practice in Public Health/ Public Health Nursing. A prelude to the provision of care the community assessment identifies the availability, affordability, accessibility and acceptability of a network of systems including health, education, risks and security. The second phase of the assessment asks about the function and outcomes of these systems in light of statutes, regulations, and objectives. The third phase includes recommendations for improvement, elimination of outdated programs and need for new programs. This presentation will describe the outcomes of an assessment of one of the oldest neighborhoods of the largest city in the state of Connecticut, and stated needs of the people living and working in this highly impoverished and most densely populated 1.273 square miles.  The College of Nursing at Sacred Heart University (SHU) has led an inter-disciplinary initiative with the College of Business, College of Arts and Science, College of Education and the College of Health Professions based the mission of the university “…to assist in the development of people knowledgeable of self, rooted in faith, educated in mind, compassionate in heart, responsive to social and civic obligations…” and the philosophy of College of Nursing which defines nursing as “caring with compassion, empathy, altruism with the intention of healing body, mind, spirit”.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Valloze is the Assistant Chair of the RN to BSN program at Daytona State College and has demonstrated exceptional knowledge of on-line course development, implementation and instruction.  She earned her master's degree as a nurse practitioner from The Sage Colleges and a Doctorate in Nursing Practice degree, along with a post-doctoral certificate in Nursing Education from the University of South Alabama. She has participated in Quality Matters course work and is currently an on line peer reviewer and e-mentor for Daytona State College faculty.  Her teaching philosophy is to make the on line classroom come alive, but also provide a structured learning experience and environment which is conducive to student retention and student success.

Abstract:

Can faculty engagement make a difference in student success and satisfaction in the online teaching environment?  Participants will formulate strategies to create a culture of excellence in the online environment  and in doing so, increase student retention and success, analyze student and faculty engagement and incorporate Quality Matters Principles into their online classrooms.  This dynamic presentation will appeal to faculty who teach hybrid or online courses and will provide a toolkit for student success that incorporates current research and outcomes for improving student retention.  The practices will include collaboration with academic support services, additional assistance for at-risk learners, flexibility with nontraditional students, best practices for student engagement and faculty presence, and creating value to increase student satisfaction.  

Speaker
Biography:

Shelly is a seasoned educator with more than 15 years experience in the continuing education industry. Shelly is especially recognized for her collaborative teaching and communication style,along with a particular aptitude for applying an innovation mindset to any situation. Notably, Shelly has an affinity for technology and informatics and has recently developed a dynamic new application for the nursing program called SNapp-Saskatchewan Nursing Application. Shelly also possesses an impressive business background, characterized by the start-up and operation of a successful private medical simulation company in Saskatchewan, as well as a NCLEX education business servicing students across Canada.

Abstract:

SNapp- Saskatchewan Nursing Application is an app that was developed by Shelly Luhning, Faculty of Nursing in the Saskatchewan Collaborative Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program (SCBScN). SNapp was created to enhance the evaluation process, improve communication and track the diverse skills of students in clinical courses. SNapp consists of a student mobile application, a faculty application, and a desktop version. Information about SNapp and how it is utilized in the clinical setting will be shared with the audience. A discussion of how SNapp has significantly changed the evaluation process for clinical courses in the SCBScN program and the benefits of using SNapp will also be reviewed.Experiences of both the faculty and the students will be shared with the audience. Innovation is taking two things that have formerly existed and creating something new. Many lessons have been learned from implementing this innovative application in the SCBScN program. The lessons learned through the implementation of innovation will be discussed. The audience is invited to ask questions regarding the utilization and the implementation of SNapp.

Speaker
Biography:

Martha Baker completed her PhD in 1999 from the   University of Missouri  Dr. Baker holds several certifications including Certified Nurse Educator, Certified in Excutivite Nursing Practice and Adult clinical Nurse specialitst. She has previousl served as President of National Alsaka Native American Indian Nurses Association. She has presented in multiple venues on the topic of Native American leadership and culturally appropriate care. 
 

Abstract:

Cultural awareness and sensitivity is essential to be able to care for our patients well. While this statement seems to be readliy apparent and univrsally agreeed upon, many nurses aand students struggle to accomplisth this task. This presentation will provide the practicing nurse or educator with aanunderstanding of the concept of cultural sensitivity and awareness. The idea of cultural competence in every situation has evolved as it is  unrealtistic to be “competent” in all cultural encounters. What nurses and educators can do is to be culturally sensitive. This approach preserves the dignity and respect for the patient and their cultural heritage. In addition, it respects the person of the nurse and their cultural heritage as well. We can educate ourselves as nurses to guide the patient of a different cultural through the maze of the health care systems by using some general guidlines in approaching the patient situations. We can use these guidlines to help us make decisions about what cultural practices we can accomadate  and recognize possible sources of conflict. If nurses recognize the possible area of conflict; problems solving can begin early with the goal of avoiding the conflict from occuring. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Patti Vanhook is Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Practice and Community Partnerships at East Tennessee State University (ETSU) College of Nursing in Johnson City, Tennessee. She became a Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner by the American Nurses Credentialing Center in 1994. Dr. Vanhook joined East Tennessee State University College of Nursing as Assistant Professor in August of 2006. In 2008, she became the Director of Practice serving as the College of Nursing leader for five of the nurse-managed clinics and resource for the College of Nursing Federally Qualified Community Health Centers Clinics. Dr. Vanhook assumed the role of Associate Dean for Practice and Community Partnerships in July 2009. In this role she has facilitated the expansion of the nurse-led clinics from five to 14 sites through local, state, and federal grants exceeding $22 million in funding. Under Dr. Vanhook’s leadership, the nurse-led community health center clinics were recognized by the Bureau of Primary Health Care in 2014 as a National Quality Leader for their quality of care outcomes. Dr. Vanhook serves on the National Nursing-Led Nursing Centers Consortium Board, the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnerships Advisory Council, and the Rural Health Association of Tennessee Board. She was recognized as East Tennessee State University Notable Woman for 2016 for her contributions to nurse-led care. She is a member of the Tennessee Nurses Association, American Nurses Association, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. 

Abstract:

The American Bar Association, the formation of the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnerships at George Washington University in Washington, DC and the American Academy of Pediatrics formed the first medical-legal partnership in 2007. Joint resolutions were passed for members to become partners with the other professional colleagues to “address the legal and social issues affecting patient health and well-being.” The American Bar Association resolution led to the creation of the Medical-Legal Partnership Pro Bono Project. In 2015, the East Tennessee State University College of Nursing was awarded a small grant from the National Nurses Consortium to participate in the development of a medical-legal partnership. The Nurse-Led Community Health Center is staffed by Nurse Practitioners who provides health care for the underserved in northeast Tennessee. The patients are diverse and include homeless, migrants, residents of public housing, uninsured, and underinsured. The first need was to identify a legal partner. The Health Center had met staff from the Tennessee Justice Center at a training session and approached them about partnering with them. However, their office is five hours driving time from the Health Center. The team became creative in using technology to link to their partner for the needed services. The team focused on meeting the needs of children as no child in Tennessee should be without insurance. Through the partnership with the Tennessee Justice Center and the Health Center eliminated barriers not only children but all patients facing healthcare access across the state.

Ericka Waidley

Linfield College-Good Samaritan School of Nursing, USA

Title: Patient’s Perceptions of the Nurse’s use of Technology in Care Delivery
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The impact of the use of technology on patient care has been a focus of the healthcare industry for many years. Recognizing the impact of technology on nursing practice and how this affects the nurse’s engagement with patients is a significant challenge for the future of nursing education and professional development.  Teaching and incorporating competencies such as transpersonal caring and patient engagement will continue to be a challenge as the evolution of technology continues at warp speed.

During the past decade, our health system has become increasingly complex. Most of this complexity has evolved from the implementation of health information technology and the use of increasingly high tech equipment in patient care. It is a fine line between the use of those technologies that are considered by patients to be for clinical necessity and those technologies that are perceived by patients to be for nursing convenience and/or economics that is at issue.

There has been an abundance of research and literature that addresses the impact of technology on the nurse’s role, much of which implies or provides evidence that the effect of technology is dehumanizing care delivery. However, the majority of this research has been on the impact on the nurse with little focus on the patients’ perceptions of the high tech environment.  This study provides information that will be crucial to the education of nurses and providers in the future.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Wang received Masters and PhD degrees in Nursing from Loyola University Chicago.  She is an Associate Professor of Nursing at North Park University.  After completing the certifications of Adult and Family Nurse Practitioner (NP) programs, she practiced as a nurse practitioner in the House Calls and Community Palliative program at Swedish Covenant Hospital in Chicago for many years.  She has published many journal articles as well as 

Abstract:

With a growing elderly population, especially the “oldest old”, in the United States, new models of care incorporating nurse practitioners (NPs) such as house calls program have been created to meet the needs of the aging population who are confined to home and are not able to access health care facility. Most of those older adults are over 85 years of age with multiple illnesses and functional impairments. Limiting to their ability to get to office visits, they frequently call ambulance and use emergency rooms for their episodic care.

House calls health providers include physicians, physician assistants, and NPs.  Among them, NPs are the largest providers delivering primary care to homebound patients over the largest geographical areas based on a 2013 observational study.  Reports from the limited outcomes studies show the reduction of preventable emergency room visits, hospital readmissions, and prescription medications per patient while patient satisfaction increases. 

The HouseCalls and Community Palliative program, supported by a community hospital and staffed by NPs, brings quality and compassionate care to frail and homebound community-dwelling older adults with the goal of promoting quality of life and reducing frequent use of emergency room for episodic care.  The objectives of this presentation are: to describe the HouseCalls program and its evaluation in general, the role of the NPs, and patient care using a HouseCalls program as an example to discuss the challenges and successes of caring for frail older adults at home.  

Speaker
Biography:

Sheri is the ACU co-lead, and nurse manager for the ACU. Ms. Bray has extensive knowledge of acute care nursing, as she has been a manager of two medicine inpatient wards, and has worked as a registered nurse on both a neonatology intensive care unit, and an oncology ward. She has taught nursing for the Saskatchewan Collaborative Bachelor of Science of Nursing program at the University of Regina As the ACU co-lead, Ms. Bray understands that patient-centered metrics can better help nurses understand inform how to provide bedside care.

Abstract:

Background:

Unit 4A, and the Medical Surveillance Unit (MSU) in Regina, Saskatchewan are the first two units to implement the Accountable Care Unit (ACU) model in Canada. Unit 4A is an acute care family medicine unit whereas MSU provides an intermediate level of patient care. Both units are supported by Hospitalists physician teams and began implementation of the ACU model in early 2016. Nurses experienced significant transformation through engagement, meaning, and mastery of nursing competency. The initial purpose of the research was to examine the effects of the ACU implementation on hospital length of stay (LOS), 30 day readmission, mortality, and patient complaints. Additionally, nursing morale was examined via changes in sick time, overtime, and staff turnover.

Methods:

Measures of LOS, mortality, and 30 day readmission, were obtained from the Health Records Department. Patient complaints, sick time, overtime, and staff turnover counts, were collated by the respective hospital departments.

Results:

Results revealed statistically significant reductions for length of stay (p < 0.05) on the MSU and 4A with no change in mortality or readmission. Reductions in patient complaints, staff sick time, overtime, and turnover, were achieved consistently across both the MSU and 4A.  

Speaker
Biography:

Marlee Cossette is the nursing manager and co-lead for the Medical Surveillance Unit at Pasqua Hospital in Regina, Saskatchewan. She graduated in 2006 with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and is currently working towards her Master of Nursing through Athabasca University. As a Registered Nurse, Marlee is proud of the achievement seen for both patients and staff through the creation and implementation of this unique patient care delivery model that combines intermediate care with the foundational pillars of Accountable Care. 

 

Abstract:

Background:

Unit 4A, and the Medical Surveillance Unit (MSU) in Regina, Saskatchewan are the first two units to implement the Accountable Care Unit (ACU) model in Canada. Unit 4A is an acute care family medicine unit whereas MSU provides an intermediate level of patient care. Both units are supported by Hospitalists physician teams and began implementation of the ACU model in early 2016. Nurses experienced significant transformation through engagement, meaning, and mastery of nursing competency. The initial purpose of the research was to examine the effects of the ACU implementation on hospital length of stay (LOS), 30 day readmission, mortality, and patient complaints. Additionally, nursing morale was examined via changes in sick time, overtime, and staff turnover.

Methods:

Measures of LOS, mortality, and 30 day readmission, were obtained from the Health Records Department. Patient complaints, sick time, overtime, and staff turnover counts, were collated by the respective hospital departments.

Results:

Results revealed statistically significant reductions for length of stay (p < 0.05) on the MSU and 4A with no change in mortality or readmission. Reductions in patient complaints, staff sick time, overtime, and turnover, were achieved consistently across both the MSU and 4A.  

Conclusion:

The ACU model leads not only to important improvements in hospital-system and clinical outcomes, but also impacts nursing satisfaction and engagement. The replication of this team based model of providing patient care has experienced such success, it is being replicated provincially and has attracted interest from across Canada.    

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Gwin has worked in the healthcare profession for 40 years. Starting out as a RN in 1979, and then became a Nurse Practitioner in 1994, she entered academia in 2001 and recognized a need and love of developing innovational curriculum approaches designed to reach new learners. Obtaining her doctorate in education of the adult learner in higher education, helped to shape concepts of new ways to teach. She has been a director in a second degree RN/FNP program for 10 years and currently is a director in a FNP program focusing on hybrid and online teaching.

Abstract:

Interprofessional education (IPE) in healthcare professions prepares students to work effectively in team-based care to improve quality and safety in patient outcomes. Reeves (2001) defined IPE as when two or more professions learn with, from, and about each other in educational scenarios. Using simulation based learning (SBL) and problem based learning (PBL) techniques fosters team work in foundational learning. These learning modalities work towards breaking down silo learning as well as disrupt hierarchical traditions that often work against the desired outcome of patient centered safety and quality outcomes. Instilling these two modalities early on in professional healthcare universities lays the groundwork for needed change in the healthcare industry. 

Speaker
Biography:

Marla Vannucci completed her PhD in Counseling Psychology from Northwestern University. She is an Associate Professor in Clinical Psychology at Adler University.  Additionally, she is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in private practice.  She conducts research and writes about work/life balance and self-care, as well as clinical supervision and training issues.  She has been featured in The Economist, Foxnews.com, Chicago Public Radio, and Mom Talk Radio discussing parenting, trauma response, and the psychology of social media.

Abstract:

This presentation will discuss results of an exploratory study that aimed to better understand the experiences and challenges of nurse entrepreneurs.  Nurse entrepreneurs (n = 44) reported on their transitions from employment to entrepreneurship, key motivators in the decision to start a business, and the challenges they face as entrepreneurs in the healthcare field.  Additionally, participants completed the 33-item Mindful Self-Care Scale – Short (Cook-Cottone & Guyker, 2016), which measured their self-care activities and behaviors in 6 domains:  Physical Care, Supportive Relationships, Mindful Awareness, Self-Compassion and Purpose, Mindful Relaxation, and Supportive Structure.  Nurse entrepreneurs reported higher rates of self-care practices than a normed community sample, and age was positively correlated with higher rates of self-care practices.  Nurse entrepreneurs reported that factors related to psychological empowerment, such as meaning/purpose, having an impact, need for growth, and getting to make decisions, were more critical motivators in the decision to start a business than factors associated with structural empowerment, such as financial gain and job or organizational constraints.  Some work/life balance challenges, such as juggling multiple roles in a business, balancing one’s own needs with those of others, time management, and addressing both family and business needs were associated with fewer self-care behaviors.  The biggest challenges to success identified, such as implementing a marketing strategy, networking, and accessing mentorship, were all related to relying on connections with others.  Implications of this study for practice will be discussed, including benefits to nurse entrepreneurs, potential nurse entrepreneurs, and others in the healthcare delivery system.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sung Hee Ahn  is a professor, teaching and doing research of nursing ethics at College of Nursing, The Catholic University of Korea. She is the president of  Korean Society of Nursing Ethics. She has published many journal articles and several books.

Abstract:

While nursing ethics education is commonly provided for undergraduate nursing students in most nursing colleges, consensus on the content and teaching modules for these ethics courses have still not been established.  This study aimed to examine the effects of nursing ethics education on the moral sensitivity and critical thinking disposition of nursing students in Korea.  A one-group pre- and post-test design was used. Moral sensitivity was measured using the Korean version of the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire. Critical thinking disposition was measured using the Critical Thinking Disposition Questionnaire. Participants were 70 undergraduate nursing students who were attending a university located in Seoul, Korea. The nursing ethics education was provided 7 times, from September to December 2010, and comprised 90-min sessions each week. This study was conducted in accordance with the Human Subject Research Ethics Committee guidelines.  After the education, the levels for the patient-oriented care, a sub-domain of moral sensitivity, and inquisitiveness, a sub-domain of critical thinking disposition, significantly improved. There were no changes in overall scores for moral sensitivity and critical thinking disposition. There were significant positive correlations between moral sensitivity and critical thinking disposition both pre- and post intervention. These results reflect the need for ongoing efforts to develop innovative content, structure, and instructional methods for undergraduate nursing ethics education programs.

Speaker
Biography:

Shirley Gharbin is an associate professor of nursing at Cecil College in Maryland, USA and has been an educator for nine years. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing from College of New Rochelle in New York, her Masters of Science in Nursing Education Leadership from Wilmington University in Delaware, and her Doctorate in Higher Education Leadership from Wilmington University in January 2017. In addition to teaching full-time at Cecil College, Shirley has been a registered nurse for seventeen years and works part-time as a cardiovascular nurse.

Abstract:

Research suggests that health professions do not collaborate well together and that separation of health profession education continues to be the standard, despite the benefits to patient outcomes.  To address this issue, an introductory interprofessional learning workshop was implemented in the spring of 2014, 2015, and 2016 with first year physician assistant (PA) students and second year associate degree nursing (RN) students to provide an opportunity for the students to learn and collaborate with other health profession students.  The purpose of the study was to examine the attitudes and perceptions of associate degree nursing students and physician assistant students towards interprofessional learning; describe the students’ perceptions of the workshops; and determine long-term effects of the interprofessional workshops.  The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was used before and after the workshops to survey the students (McFadyen, Webster, & Maclaren, 2006).  Additionally, a two item qualitative questionnaire was used to assess the students’ perceptions of the learning intervention and to identify long-term effects.  Results showed overall positive attitudes and perceptions before and after the workshops with slight increases in RIPLS scores post- workshop.  Qualitative analysis of student’s written responses revealed six dominant themes: opportunity to interact with other health care students, understanding professional roles and responsibilities, building confidence; importance of communication; importance of teamwork; and patient benefit.  Follow-up post- workshop assessments a year later, suggests long term effects of the interprofessional workshops. The workshop is presently part of the curriculum for both nursing and physician assistant programs.

Speaker
Biography:

Kelley Obringer is a PhD student enrolled at Mennonite College of Nursing at Illinois State University. This research is conducted for her dissertation. Ms Obringer,has taught in the undergraduate and graduate programs of nursing. She currently is employed at the University of Tenennessee Chattanooga as an Assoicate Professor of nursing. She has presented research at National and International Conferences.  Her research trajectory involves family, culture, and end of life care.  

Abstract:

The 2015 U.S census reported an increase in the number of African Americans, indicating a growth by 4.1 % from 2010 to 2015. In addition, there were 37, 144,530 Non-Hispanic blacks, which comprised 12.1% of the population. This number increased to 42 million according to the 2010 United States Census, when including Multiracial African Americans, making up 14% of the total U.S. population (United States Census, 2016). Studies have shown end of life needs may differ by culture. To provide the best care during the end of life transition, it is necessary to understand the needs and experiences of the diverse populations. To provide best care during the end of life transition, it is necessary to understand the needs and experiences of African American family members during their loved one’s palliative care. There is a lack of research regarding the understanding of the life experiences of African American family members during a loved one’s end of life care experience and how spiritual beliefs impact their experience. The purpose of this study is to understand the experience of the African American family members’ during their loved one’s end of life. A qualitative study was conducted using a convenience sample of 16 family members’ from one outpatient South Eastern Palliative Healthcare Organization in the USA. Participants completed an interview to determine experience of family members’ of loved ones enrolled in Palliative Care. Results of this study can facilitate healthcare professionals to develop and implement methods to further meet family members’ needs.

 

Speaker
Biography:

U.S. statistics show that 3 out of 5 registered nurses worked in hospitals in 2006. In 2016, however, less than one third of nurses were employed at hospitals. These statistics indicate a decreasing number of acute care facilities, while community health is expanding in response to a health care policy that emphasizes prevention and management of chronic diseases. In response to the this evolving health care focus, nursing faculties in academia have implemented baccalaureate curricula introducing new didactic courses. Yet, clinical site teaching has remained focused on training students for assessments, technical nursing skills, and critical thinking exercises, at best, in acute care.

This paper presents and analyzes the results of evidence-based research that illustrates the need for matching didactic with clinical teaching. It will concentrate on methods necessary for training future nurses in diverse health care settings and will propose ways that student and preceptor nurses in acute care and community offer mutually benefiting factors in the process of learning and teaching. 

Abstract:

Eunice Park-Clinton received her Masters in Nursing and Bioethics from the University of Pennsylvania. She worked as an Intensive Care Unit nurse for several years and is a Case Manager at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Since 2016 she has been working as a clinical instructor at Gwynedd-Mercy University. 

Speaker
Biography:

Charlotte M. Wood is an Associate Professor at Coppin State University, College of Health Professions, Helene Fuld School of Nursing. She received her BSN (1982) from Delaware State University, her MSN/MBA from Johns Hopkins University (2003), and completed her PhD from Capella University (2014).  She is currently the President of the Faculty Senate at Coppin State University. Chair of the Student Success and the Applied Analytics Councils appointed by the President of the University. She is a data scientist with her certification in Predictive Data Analytics. Her nursing practice includes Critical Care nursing, geriatrics, nursing education, student assessment and remediation, and administration.

Abstract:

Novice nurses must be knowledgeable and confident in their clinical skills when providing effective care to highly complex patient populations. To recruit, retain, graduate and prepare nursing students adequately, nursing educators are integrating confidence-building teaching strategies such as, high-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS). This descriptive, correlational quantitative study examined whether a relationship existed among African American senior nursing students’ perceptions of the instructional strategies of various ways of learning, active learning, expectations, and collaboration used with HFPS, and their association with perceived confidence in learning as measured by the National League for Nurses’ Educational Practices and Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Questionnaires. The study examined age and grade point average. Data were collected from two schools of nursing with a nonprobability convenience sample of 83 participants. Participants perceptions of the use and importance of the four instructional strategies used in HFPS was measured using two Likert-type scales that ranged from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree) and 1 (not important) to 5 (very important).  Results showed that all four instructional strategies used in HFPS had a useful and important role. Demographic data provided insight into specific age groups and instructional strategies that reflected a statistically significant relationship with self-confidence.

Speaker
Biography:

Chiharu Miyata, RN, Master of Nursing Science, completed her Dr. of Human Health Science from Kyoto University School of Medicine, Japan. She is the associate professor of Mie University of Nursing  Sciences in Japan. She has published several books and papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute. 

Abstract:

More than 26% of the population 65 years and over in Japan. Therefore, the needs and quality of geriatric nursing should be improved. In spite of ineligible changes of nursing standards in geriatric intermediate care facilities(GICFs), the quality of care is not in a satisfied level. In order to improve the quality of care, reconsidering professionalism of nurses is crucial. Moreover, it is important to address appropriate working environment to develop, maintain and enhance their professional behavior. Objectives: The aim of this study was to uncover relation and whether factors could have any effect on professional behavior of nurses in GICFs. Methodology: A quantitative, cross-sectional desigh was adopted, using a self-completion questionnaire survey. The questionnaires consisted of 65 items for job satisfaction, organizational commitment (affective, continuance, and normative commitment), professional behavior and the background information of respondents.  Results: A total of 1,189 nurses participated. Of those, 91% (n=1084) were women, 75% (n=890) were married. The professional work experience was  23.1years(SD10.5) . Most were derector of nursing (n=777; 65%).The job satisfaction  correlated with affective commitment and normative commitment. The professional behavior is related to marital status,  academic background and affective commitment. Conclusions: Affective commitment is directly proportional to positive work experience. Thus, administrators require to understanding nurses psychology, emotions, and expectations, and by catering to nurses need in a manner that resulted improve their job satisfaction. In addition, management policies that make proper strength and weakness assessments of nurses and experience positive work experiences, help to improve professional behavior of nurses.

Speaker
Biography:

Patricia (Harvard) Hinchberger, EdD, GCNS, APRN has been a nurse for over 20 years. She has held many influential and often nontraditional roles in nursing education, global community health and culture.  She is currently faculty and coordinator of the online RN to BSN program at California State University San Marcos. 

Abstract:

The perception of Global Health and nursing practice varies worldwide.  As countries with limited resources begin to move toward improving care through standardization, there have been an increasing number of international collaborative educational training opportunities. A recent example of this type of collaboration occurred in the village of Bafut Cameroon where training for healthcare personnel was focused on Western standards of care, Western standard operating procedures, and facilitated by an American Nurse Educator. All newly hired personnel attended mandatory orientations provided by the Nurse Educator. Classes on job performance, patient confidentiality, and Code of Conduct were the primary concepts presented. During training, Participatory Action Research, Participant Observations, and an Ethnography worldview were used to assess willingness, resistance, or barriers to Western standards of practice. Themes identified related to cultural differences in the perception of healthcare and values associated with social norms and ideals. These identified themes seemed to prevented or delayed ongoing integration of newly learned standards. 

Speaker
Biography:

Lorna Kendrick is the current Director of Nursing at California State University San Marcos. Dr. Kendrick earned her PhD from UCLA School of Nursing. Her research focuses on culture and collaboration with her global community partners using Participatory Action Research and Ethnography to guide her worldview.  

Abstract:

The perception of Global Health and nursing practice varies worldwide.  As countries with limited resources begin to move toward improving care through standardization, there have been an increasing number of international collaborative educational training opportunities. A recent example of this type of collaboration occurred in the village of Bafut Cameroon where training for healthcare personnel was focused on Western standards of care, Western standard operating procedures, and facilitated by an American Nurse Educator. All newly hired personnel attended mandatory orientations provided by the Nurse Educator. Classes on job performance, patient confidentiality, and Code of Conduct were the primary concepts presented. During training, Participatory Action Research, Participant Observations, and an Ethnography worldview were used to assess willingness, resistance, or barriers to Western standards of practice. Themes identified related to cultural differences in the perception of healthcare and values associated with social norms and ideals. These identified themes seemed to prevented or delayed ongoing integration of newly learned standards. 

Deepti B. Prajapati

New York University Langone Medical Center, USA

Title: Considerations for Creating a Protocol for Vedolizumab Infusions
Speaker
Biography:

Deepti B. Prajapati has completed her Bachelors of Nursing at Western Connecitcut State University and Masters of Nursing degree at Southern Connecticut State University.  She has been a Nurse Practitioner for over 5 years, starting out in Orthopedics and Pain Management.  She is currently working in one of NYU Langone Medical Center’s Infusion Center, focusing on rheumatic diseases.

Abstract:

Vedolizumab (Entyvio) is one of several treatment options for the management of Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease. It is a recombinant humanized anti-alpha-4-beta-7 integrin monoclonal antibody. Integrins are proteins involved in regulating cellular movement, including the migration of leukocytes to the gut.  It is specific to the intestinal tract because it binds to the alpha-4-beta-7 integrin, thereby blocking the interaction of the alpha-4-beta-7 integrin with mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1.  This results in the inhibition of memory T-lymphocytes migrating across the endothelium into inflamed gastrointestinal tissue.  This biologic immunotherapy is utilized in patients who have failed or achieved inadequate response to the different therapies currently available for these disease processes. Certain considerations include monitoring/screening for tuberculosis (TB), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), and liver injury. These are rare adverse effects and occurrences. A protocol for the safe administration of Vedolizumab at NYU's CMC Infusion Center is based on current prescribing guidelines.

Speaker
Biography:

A Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP-BC). Over 26 years’ experience in nursing profession. Earned a Doctor of Nursing Practice from Carlow University Pittsburgh, PA. A full time Tenured Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of the District of Columbia Community College (UDC-CC) for 11 years. Taught undergraduate nursing courses which includes Maternal-newborn nursing theory & practicum. One of the Women in STEM and Allied Health featured in celebration of Women History Month at UDC-CC in 2016. Travelled widely in the USA and made several national presentations and has published several articles in peer reviewed scholarly nursing journals

Abstract:

Nursing today is predominantly a female profession; however men are reentering the profession in record numbers and challenging the perspective that they are inappropriate in care-giver roles, or incapable of providing compassionate and sensitive care. Because of this, male nursing students face gender based role stress when caring for maternal-newborn clinical patients (Tzeng, Chen, Tu, & Tsai, 2009). This study investigated the perceptions and experiences of male nursing students in a maternal-newborn nursing course and their coping strategies in dealing with the role stress. A purposive sample included 11 male nursing students who completed a survey, and six participated in individual interviews. Written responses and verbatim audio narratives were analyzed using qualitative content analysis to identify themes that described their perceptions and experiences. The results identified seven themes: Desire to care for others; Female dominance in nursing profession; Maternal-newborn nursing course creates anxiety and intimidation; the course is identified as a woman’s domain; individuals leave other careers to pursue nursing; experiences of rejection, acceptance and fear of unknown, and the male nurse’s use of different coping strategies. Despite the significant stress for male nurses in the maternal-newborn environment, they agreed that the profession of nursing should not be gender specific and that men should be encouraged to pursue nursing careers. The results suggested a need for nurse educators to develop theory-guided instructional strategies to support male nursing student’s academic goals which may be at stake because of the maternity learning environment. 

Maria D Krol

Southern Connecticut State University, USA

Title: Teaching transcultural nursing using Kolb’s theory
Speaker
Biography:

Maria D Krol completed her DNP from Oakland University. She has been in practice for over 25 years. Last 12 years as an educator for nursing students. Most recently at Southern Connecticut State University. She is the founder and President of the Connecticut Chapter of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses. Her clinical work has led her to embark on a mission to improve the understanding nursing students gain in regards to health disparities. She has published and taught on that subject.

Abstract:

Kolb’s experiential learning theory and learning cycle was used as a framework to deliver content related to Limited English Proficiency (LEP) and Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care (CLAS) standards. Application of Kolb’s theory enabled students to absorb what was seen in the clinical settings, identify what their values are and reflect on their experiences. Ultimately students used technology to translate their new-found knowledge to others.  This active learning project was collaborative; and, in keeping with Kolb’s framework, could accommodate different learning styles based on the role students assumed during the assignment. The culminated of this project produced a student enacted, educational video presented at a university-wide event affirming the importance of delivering care in a culturally sensitive manner.

Speaker
Biography:

Jennifer Harrison Siu completed her Doctorate in Education May 2011 from California State University, Sacramento. She is the Assitant Director at Sacramento City College, Associate Degree Nursing Program in which she worked there for 28 years.  She received her Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing at University of San Francisco, Master’s of Science in Nursing with a Clinical Nurse Specialty in Maternal Child Health in San Antonia, Texas and a Master in Biblical Studies at Dallas Theological Seminary in Texas.  She is a retired United States Air Force Nursing, having served for 21 ½ years and retiring as Lieutenant Colonel.

Abstract:

The central issue is that NCLEX-RN standards have been raised requiring nursing graduates to demonstrate greater knowledge on the national licensure examination in order to be licensed.  This has ramifications for nursing programs and their ability to sustain a high percentage of graduates from diverse backgrounds who go on to pass the NCLEX as first-time test takers.  This study investigated the practices and programmatic features of Sacramento City College’s nursing program, a successful program characterized by its history in producing graduates from diverse backgrounds who passed the NCLEX-RN.  The findings of this mixed methods study, which used data sources from faculty and graduate surveys, curricula documents, and NCLEX reports, supported observations and published recommendations of best practices noted by nursing education experts.  The study also presented factors not commonly found in the research, such as maintaining a rigorous nursing program and high NCLEX passing rates while upholding diversity trends within its student body and the open access policy on a community college campus.  In conclusion, the study explicitly recognized that the state’s investment in nursing education cannot be evaluated by simply examining NCLEX success – the ultimate return on investment in nursing programs is having graduates practice nursing in California.

Wafaa Elarousy

King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences, Saudi Arabia

Title: Exploring the experiences of nursing students in debriefing: a qualitative study
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Wafaa Elarousy is assistant professor, pediatric nursing, Chair of the Student Research Unit, college of nursing – Jeddah, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for health Science since Academic year 2009 -2010 till now.   Dr. Wafaa Elarousy completed her master degree and her PhD in Pediatric nursing from the college of nursing, Alexandria University, Egypt.  She has a position of Assistant professor in the same college. She has 16 publications, her research interest: In the area of neonatology, adolescents’ health, child abuse and neglect, pediatric simulation and nursing education.  

Abstract:

Debriefing is a process involving the active participation of learners, guided by a facilitator or instructor whose primary goal is to identify and close gaps in knowledge and skills (Raemer D. 2011 & Pivec J., Renee C., 2011). It promotes understanding and supports transfer of knowledge, skills and attitudes with focus on safe and high quality of patient care (Decker S. Et.al 2013). Our college students’ qualitative survey of fall semester academic year 2015-2016 for many clinical courses included negative feedbacks that reported by students related to debriefing period. So, the aim of the study is to explore in depth the experiences of nursing students in debriefing through a qualitative design. A debriefing task force committee was developed by College Quality Unit and the results of the current study will help the work of this committee.   

Methodolgy: The study was conducted at College of Nursing – Jeddah, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University of Health Science and included nursing students who enrolled in clinical courses using convenient sampling technique. A qualitative research design was used as the researchers believe that qualitative research will achieve the objective.  Focus group discussion was used until saturation of information is achieved on the topic. Using the recorded interviews and transcription verbatim, analysis is done using content analysis.

Results: We are in the process of finalization of research results

Key wards: debriefing, student nurses, qualitative study

Speaker
Biography:

Theresa Wyatt achieved a BSN from Mercy College in Detroit, a Masters in Forensic Nursing from Fitchburg State College, and a PhD in Nursing from Medical University of South Carolina. A nurse of 31 years with 16 years in the emergency department, 5 years as a Forensic Nurse Examiner, and 6 years teaching both clinical and the classroom. Having cared for patients that have experienced all forms of domestic violence and sexual assault, Theresa is dedicated to improving DV content included in nursing curriculum. 

Abstract:

Numerous barriers to screening patients for domestic violence (DV) appear consistently in research. Existing studies conducted on barriers to screening by nurses identified lack of education and training as a commonly identified barrier to screening.  When and how these barriers develop is poorly understood. Qualitative interviews with 16 newly licensed nurses (NLRNs) were conducted to determine if they screen for DV, how they screen for DV, which patients are screened, and how pre-licensure education and current workplace training has influenced these screening. An exploratory qualitative design guided by Constructivist Grounded Theory (CGT) was used. Sixteen NLRNs who were contacted via a social media (Facebook) ‘sharing’ strategy agreed to participate in the study.  Individual interviews were conducted utilizing an open ended interview guide. Data collection and analysis were done concurrently exploring factors influencing screening behaviors.  Six themes emerged from the interview data: Preparedness, Uncomfortable, Taboo, Disenchanted, Presumptuous, and an over-arching them, Evolving Truths. In this sample of NLRNs, the overall perception was a lack of education and training on DV. These findings suggest this sample of NLRNs were not taught about or how to screen for DV, and essentially became products of their work environment reporting that if and how diligently they screened was heavily influenced by their peers. There is an interpersonal or intimate nature to screening for DV that is unique and may require highly interactive training throughout pre-licensure education. This study is one of the first to examine how inadequate or lack of inclusion of DV screening in pre-licensure nursing education may affect screening behavior in NLRNs.