Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 24th Global Nursing & Healthcare Conference Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Lisa Quinones

Sunysuffolk County Community College, USA

Keynote: Direct mentoring: Bringing culture home
Nursing Global 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lisa Quinones photo
Biography:

Lisa Fernandez is an Associate Professor of Nursing at SCCC.  She is a lecturer, clinical instructor and course coordinator for Maternal/Child Health Nursing.  She is also a lecturer, lab instructor and course coordinator for Health Assessment. Her diverse responsibilities in the Nursing Department make it possible for me to meet and interact with many students from both classes - which is probably her favorite aspect of her job.

 

Abstract:

The National League of Nursing (NLN) 2016 Summit choose priority goals annually to enhance and improve excellence among our most noble profession. This years’ topic was a global focus-the theme focusing “Beyond Borders”. The NLN promotes excellence in nursing education to build a strong and diverse nursing workforce to advance the health of our nation and the global community. Culture is and has always been a dynamic and relevant virtue to the healthcare delivery system more than ever in the current worldwide milieu taking into consideration the political and economic issues that cannot be ignored. The International Council of Nurses (ICN) collaborated with the NLN to establish the ICNEN-a forum to address nursing education worldwide which was launched in Durban, South Africa in July 2009. It is an innate characteristic among nursing as profession to ultimately become paradigm shifters with common ideas as we continuously evolve. In 2006, I was invited to join Hope for a Healthier Humanity, an NGO affiliated with Catholic charities of Central and Caribbean America. I was chosen through a data base of bilingual ob/gyn nurse practitioners to volunteer some time to visit El Salvador to teach, evaluate and focusing on imparting health information to “promoters”, members of local churches who can learn how to deal with health needs as medical care is sparse if non-existent. The main focus was to investigate and evaluate why maternal/infant mortality and morbidity was so prevalent. What was to turn out to be a one-time trip, converted into becoming curriculum director and consultant for Central American countries, El Salvador, Honduras over 10 times, Panama and the Dominican Republic for seven years while working at the college. After constant refining of curriculums according to needs of each country, creating practical physical exam elements for practice, climbing mountains with minimal equipment and assessing the best I could as I shared the information. Higher the mountains, the more deplorable conditions are, no sanitation, no soil to grow vegetation only ash from the fires that burns garbage and so many other things too awful to mention. I met with archbishops and cardinals to try to make sense of all the violence and unending poverty. I had traveled once or twice with colleagues from other colleges but I realized, I should not be creating nor viewing these experiences alone. I asked my Dean of Nursing, the CEO Mary Sedutto of HHH and Dean of International Studies if I could bring graduates on these medical missions to be witness and learn that there is so much happening behind their backyards. I began to create live footage with each trip as my students quickly learned the curriculum and taught objectives.

Nursing Global 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker G K Rikabi  photo
Biography:

G K Rikabi has three years of experience in Teaching in Family Nurse Practitioner program with a focus on Collaborative Instructions. She also teaches joint injections. She has over nine years of experience as a Family Nurse Practitioner with a focus on “Occupational medicine, HIV, women’s health and orthopedic”. She completed her Doctoral Degree in 2013, with a research focus on Patient-Centered Care. She is currently an Assistant Professor at University of Southern Mississippi. Her research experience includes “HIV, dyslipidemia and healthcare professionals practice with multicultural patients”.

Abstract:

Background & Aim: Untreated dyslipidemia, which is a risk factor for cardiac illnesses, is a burden on individual of state and national levels due to morbidity, mortality and coronary heart disease-related costs. Implementation of patient-centered educational program improves patients’ care and health outcomes. Purpose of this study is to increase adherence to lifestyle modifications among patients with dyslipidemia.

Method: 17 subjects with dyslipidemia participated in a quasi-experimental pilot project. Qualitative and quantitative methodology was used. Measures were heart disease fact questionnaire, Framingham tool, and physiologic measurements. Interventions included motivational techniques-led individual and group interviews to explore patient-centered barriers and to discover strategies to adhere to lifestyle changes.

Conclusion: Patient-centered interventions to discover patients’ barriers and strategies to adhere to lifestyle modifications through motivational interviewing effect have increased patient knowledge on risks and prevention of coronary heart disease and enhanced adherence to lifestyle modifications.

Implication to Practice: The system change highlights the uniqueness of each person that require patient-centeredness and continuity of care to improve health outcomes.

 

Keynote Forum

Ricardo Roberson Rivero

Regional Nursing Council of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Keynote: Technology ensuring the continuity of care in health APP care plan oncology
Nursing Global 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ricardo Roberson Rivero photo
Biography:

Graduate in Nursing from the Lutheran University of Brazil (2006). His professional and academic career has always been focused on the areas of Education, Health and Social Care. As Guardianship Counselor in Alegrete Municipality developed the project every child in the State of RS Government School at the beginning of my professional career I worked as Assistant and nursing technician at Hospital Santa Casa de Porto Alegre and Sao Lucas Hospital, PUC-RS. In the Social Assistance Foundation and Citizenship in the city of Porto Alegre was manager of the Municipal Hostel, Coordinator of the Night Approach and Manager of Special Houses which meets all juvenile offenders referred by the Special Court. President of the RS Regional Nursing Council - a government agency 2012-1014. Currently serves as Nurse Care Hospital Santa Rita institution specialized in the treatment Oncology and Director of Establishment of Special RS Protection Foundation - FPERS. Main activities: Public Management, Education, Law and Nursing.

 

Abstract:

Introduction: patient safety and the incorporation of technologies are priority agendas for health services. In this context, nurses must develop knowledge and skills in order to evaluate the use of technologies and incorporate them into the daily routine, prioritizing aspects related to patient safety, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, social impact and ethical aspects involved. Objective: to report the experience of the construction of a software in the area of ​​clinical oncology. Material and Methods: study of technological development, with the production of a software for guidelines on the treatment and care of the cancer patient. In the construction of the software was used the object-oriented methodology and the steps of the construction of the application followed the Scrum tool. Results: the software allows the follow-up and evolution of the clinical treatment of cancer patients, mainly in the chemotherapy process. In addition, it provides information and enables real-time interactivity with the multiprofessional team. The system helps the team to plan their interventions in an individualized and safe way to the patient. Conclusion: the development of this software contributed to accompany the assistance, allowing greater interaction between the patient and the team. The benefits provided by technological advances, especially softwares, in the treatment of oncology, in the sense of developing and making available new arsenals, bringing optimistic perspectives to the treatment. Contributions / Implications for Patient Safety: In brief, software building helps care for cancer patients. The use of technologies has an impact on care, as it contributes to the organization of the work process and brings the patient and the family closer to care. The software is a tool that can reduce the adverse events contributing in the dissemination of the culture of patient safety, since it corroborates with the best practices in clinical oncology.

 

  • Cardiovascular Nursing, Mental Health Nursing,Pediatric Nursing, Critical Nursing, Community Nursing
Location: Hall 2
Speaker
Biography:

She was a registered nurse from 1996 – 2004 in the surgical departmant, Banpong Hospital, Thailand 2004-2005 Diabetic foot care clinic, Banpong Hospital, Thailand.She started her education as RN, 1995, Boromarajonani Collage of Nursing, Thailand MS, 2004, faculty of Nursing, Burapha University Ph.D., 2011, Faculty of Nursing, Burapha University. She is a lecturer at Burapha University, Chonburi province, Thailand. The area of interest is self-management, case managment especially, type 2 diabetes patients. I would like to conduct effective program to delay complications and improve self – management for patients.

Abstract:

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence of the complications for microvascular and determining factors influencing microvascular complications. Data were collected from 350 patients with type 2 diabetes, who received the cares at the diabetes clinics from eleven governmental hospitals located in the Eastern region of Thailand. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics, and binary logistic regression analysis.

The results revealed that there were 239 cases having the complications for microvascular, calculated as 68. 3% (95 %CI: 63 % – 73 %). Among diabetic patients with microvascular complications, diabetic kidney disease accounted for the majority of them (35.98 %), followed by diabetic retinopathy (24.68 %) and peripheral neuropathy (5.44 %) There were relationships between the following variables: age, HbA1C, triglycerides level, duration of diabetes, and the complications as such with statistical significance (p <. 01). Participants, who had age over sixty years, had higher risk of having microvascular complications about 13.48 times (OR = 13.48, 95%CI: 2.18 – 83.48). Those with the diabetes who had HbA1C level more than 8 % showed a higher chance of microvascular complications than those with HbA1C level less than 7 %.46 times (OR = .46, 95%CI: .23 – .90). Participants, who had high triglycerides level showed a higher chance of microvascular complications about 2.15 times (OR = 2.15, 95%CI: 1.20 – 3.85). Moreover, those with the diabetes for over 20 years showed a higher chance of microvascular complications about 4.76 times than those with diabetes for shorter time (OR = 4.76, 95%CI: 1.28 – 17.67).

Conclusion: Such findings can be used for health care provider in order to develop the intervention focused on micro vascular complications in early diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients. Early identification of diabetic kidney disease, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy early care management lead to prevent micro vascular complications.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. MacDonald completed a Master’s degree in Nursing at the University of Toronto, Canada and a PhD at the University of Manchester in the UK. Currently she is a Professor in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of New Brunswick (Canada). Dr. MacDonald’s doctoral work examined respite for parents who were caring for children who required complex care. This paper comes from that work. Dr. MacDonald has three children of her own.

 

Abstract:

In this grounded theory study 40 English speaking women from a rural province of Canada were interviewed to learn about their experiences of returning to work after a depression. Women described getting back in the game as being difficult and challenging as they had not completely recovered by the time they returned to work. However, they felt compelled to return to work in order to keep their jobs, in order to resume health and social benefits, and to reinstate their wages. A number of themes emerged from the interview data. These included the presence of stigma, the active pursuit of silence, and battling adversity. Each of these core themes serves to describe the women’s experiences of returning to work. The women described wearing a mask or “putting on a face” to combat the stigma associated with their illness. In this presentation the three themes will be discussed along with a thorough description of wearing a mask. Strategies that employers can employ to ease the transition back to work will be discussed.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Minet Tesfai Hadish has graduated his Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) from School of Nursing, Asmara College of Health Sciences, Asmara, Eritrea  with a very  great distinction and awarded  Gold Medal in 2010.  He has  worked in the same college for six years as an assistant lecturer; nurse practitioner, class room instructor, researcher, clinical teacher and course coordinator,  as well as member of the executive committee for research coordination of the school of nursing and the college. He is active member of the Eritrean Nurses Association (ERINA) and in close association with BDHO; the Eritrean National HIV/AIDS Association as Trainer and Consultant. Currently, he is studying Master’s of Nursing Science at School of Nursing, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In Cameroon and Gabon the most highly HIV prevalent West African countries, adolescents are sexually active before age 15. The main complications of early and unsafe sexual intercourse are unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, death, abnormal sexual behaviors, and long-lasting or even lifelong mental and physical health consequences. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the predicting factors of early initiation of sex among 15-24 aged Cameroonian and Gabonese youth. Methods: This study used nationally representative datasets from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) of Cameroon (2011) and Gabon (2012). A total of 14,880 youth were participated.  SPSS version 22 was used to run a binary multivariate logistic regression. Result: Their first sex was early, ranged from their 5th to 24th years old with a mean age of 10.69±7.69 in Cameroon and 12.36±6.32 in Gabon. Most of Cameroonian (51.5%) and Gabonese (78.4%) youth had sex before their first marriage or cohabitation. First marriage before age 15 was high among Cameroonian (36.1%) and Gabonese (25.6%) youth. On multivariate analysis, age, place of residence, educational level, religion, marital status, wealth index, occupation, comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitude towards people living with HIV of respondents were found to be significant predictors  sex before age 15, premarital sex and marriage before 15 variables. Comparing by gender, Cameroonian and Gabonese males were more likely to have higher premarital sex and sex before age 15. However, Cameroonian males (AOR=0.23, p<0.001) and Gabonese males (AOR=0.20, p=<0.001) were less likely to be married before age 15 than their female counterparts. Conclusion: In this study, the predicting factors of early initiation of sex among youth were contextually related to the demographic and sociocultural background of the participants, and therefore, designing sexual health education based on their different needs is crucial. Besides, parents and school collaboration can be a fundamental tool to prevent the early initiation of sex among youth.

Key words: predictors, early sex, HIV/AIDS, youth, Cameroon, Gabon.

 

 

 

 

 

Biography:

  Sylvain Haba was  born on July 10/1963 in Kpoulo (Region of N'Zérékoré). He is the father of three children. He took  admission to the baccalaureate in 1984, guidance for school nurses during 1985-88. He has done internships during 1989- 1997 in a medical post in Sebtete Prefecture of Gaoual and during 1992-1993 distance education on medical semiology.In 1998 he was admitted for service to the public service and during  2004-2005 Traditional medicine training in DR Congo. He returned to  Guinea in 2006 creation of the Center of medical care, traditional spiritual Talithakoumi (Marc5: 41--42) in (Labe) Guinea. In 2008 he got transferred  from the center to Conakry

Abstract:

In Guinea, the health system was unreliable, its fragility rapidly favored the spread of EBOLA, but prevention by vaccinations was essential, health education was not respected because of tradition and certain practices Religious and traditional (insufficient vaccination coverage for fear of AIDS, excision, tattooing, polygamy, illiteracy, lack of communication, lack of hygiene, no information for health, Alcohol and smoking).
Many unhealed patients in hospitals are sometimes abandoned to themselves either because of high fees for care or lack of appropriate proper treatment on everything in mental patients or HIV and congenital diseases.
The lack of the educational system generally worsens the improvement of certain critical areas.
The Talitha-koumi center of which I am the leader uses his means to help some using modern medicine, traditional medicine using plants, and animal substances by asking God's grace for the healing of those who turn to This center.
These patients are chained because of their agitation, their violence, the attempts to flee.
The elderly generally suffer from complications of high blood pressure, diabetes, syphilis, meningitis, HIV, eclampsia.
Children, sativa canabis, alcohol, tobacco, cocaine, HIV.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

 

Laureen Turner is a dedicated professional with a passion for interactive, evidence-based teaching pedagogy to enhance student learning. In the classroom, she utilizes several interactive opportunities to enhance student learning. In the clinical setting, she works toward finding unique learning opportunities to augment classroom instruction and promote critical thinking. Her areas of clinical expertise include: Pediatrics, Maternal Child, Home Care, Hospice Care, Nursery and Informatics. Her Teaching expertise includes Professional Nursing, Pediatrics, Maternal Child, Evidence-Based Practice and Nursing Informatics. Additionally, she lectures on topics of active learning strategies, critical thinking in clinical education and preparation for clinical education, self-efficacy and faculty mentorship.

 

Abstract:

This presentation consists of informing participants about best practices in active learning to be used in the typical lecture classroom. Content will focus on the use of strategies that include audience response systems, case studies, gaming, classroom assessment techniques (CATS) and collaborative learning. A focus will be on the effective use of technology in the classroom that includes smart phones, tablets and computers.

 

Biography:

Magda Bayoumi is currently working as an assistant professor in Beni -Suef University and the specialization is on Critical Nursing. DR. Magda Bayoumi is
RN,MSN,DSN Lecturerin the Medical-Surgical Nursing Department of Beni- Suef University, Egypt.

Abstract:

Background: Assessment of the traditional vital signs at ICUs as temperature, pulse, respiration, blood pressure and oxygen saturation are inadequate to determine patients’ clinical condition deteriorating; however assessment of eight vital signs should be included in a routine nursing assessment to improve patients’ outcomes for appropriate nursing diagnosis on proper time.

Aim: To assess nurses’ perception toward using a new eight vital signs chart at ICU.

Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional study design was used in this study composed of 45 nurses from all ICUs at the Beni-Suef University Hospital from November 2015 to January 2017., data were collected using structured interview to assess nurses’ perception toward using a new eight vital signs chart at ICUs.

Results: The study findings demonstrate the distribution of all nurses’ perception items and found more than two third of the study sample (68.9%) were agreed to use eight vital signs, and almost all nurses had fantastic perception to eight vital signs, moreover about (84.4%) had adequate knowledge regarding assessment of pain, level of consciousness, urine output , as well as more than half of study sample reported the degree of importance  is extremely  important to assess additional three vital signs with basic vital signs (55.6%) . However barrier may face nurses to assess pain, level of consciousness and urine output were reported high percentage (91.1%), and (97.8%) agreed to use the new eight vital signs chart at ICUs and defiantly it will help for better design of Nursing Diagnosis.

Conclusion:  ICU nurses strongly agreed to apply new 8 vital signs chart at ICUs for meticulous designing of nursing diagnosis of patients’ clinically unstable.

Recommendation: The study is recommended to consider the importance of application a new eight vital signs chart instead of traditional five vital signs and generalized it in the hospital documentation system.

Keywords: Eight vital signs, ICUs, Nurses’ Perception, Egypt.

Speaker
Biography:

Rianne Carragher is MSN, RN, NP-C and her  clinical area of expertise is with the adult and gerontology population with an additional focus in renal and heart health working toward wellness promotion and illness prevention.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The World Health Organization has ranked the Middle East as the second most prevalent region globally for Type 2 diabetes. Effective provision and maintenance of care for patients with type 2 diabetes requires an interdisciplinary approach in order to negate further financial burden on the healthcare system. Currently, treatment options initiated by physicians focus mainly on pharmaceuticals however, lifestyle factors also have a tremendous impact on a patient’s wellness or illness. Unhealthy behaviours remain the primary cause of co-morbidities related to type 2 diabetes. A potential solution to this issue is to use an inter-professional team approach when caring for this patient population. Continued support from multiple healthcare disciplines, involving pharmacists, dieticians, physicians and nurses promotes holistic and patient centred health care leading to decreased type 2 diabetes complications and hospital admissions. The purpose of this narrative review is to look at the present literature involving the use of an inter-professional team approach to the care and maintenance of type 2 diabetic persons in the Middle East. The aim is to construct meaning surrounding the use and effectiveness of this collaborative approach with this patient population. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: This research commenced with a systematic review that utilizes a constructionist theory as the theoretical framework. Conclusion & Significance: Type 2 diabetic patients need to be involved in a collaborative approach to care in order to prevent potential related health problems. It is imperative that all individuals working with the inter-professional team demonstrate working collaboratively and holistically with the type 2 diabetic population.

Speaker
Biography:

Jessie Johnson is RN, PhD and her research expertise involves looking at inter-professional teamwork and care and management of persons with chronic disease and inter-professional teamwork and the care and maintenance of palliative persons.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The World Health Organization has ranked the Middle East as the second most prevalent region globally for Type 2 diabetes. Effective provision and maintenance of care for patients with type 2 diabetes requires an interdisciplinary approach in order to negate further financial burden on the healthcare system. Currently, treatment options initiated by physicians focus mainly on pharmaceuticals however, lifestyle factors also have a tremendous impact on a patient’s wellness or illness. Unhealthy behaviours remain the primary cause of co-morbidities related to type 2 diabetes. A potential solution to this issue is to use an inter-professional team approach when caring for this patient population. Continued support from multiple healthcare disciplines, involving pharmacists, dieticians, physicians and nurses promotes holistic and patient centred health care leading to decreased type 2 diabetes complications and hospital admissions. The purpose of this narrative review is to look at the present literature involving the use of an inter-professional team approach to the care and maintenance of type 2 diabetic persons in the Middle East. The aim is to construct meaning surrounding the use and effectiveness of this collaborative approach with this patient population. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: This research commenced with a systematic review that utilizes a constructionist theory as the theoretical framework. Conclusion & Significance: Type 2 diabetic patients need to be involved in a collaborative approach to care in order to prevent potential related health problems. It is imperative that all individuals working with the inter-professional team demonstrate working collaboratively and holistically with the type 2 diabetic population.