Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 24th Global Nursing & Healthcare Conference Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Heather MacDonald

University of New Brunswick,Canada

Keynote: Respite for parents of children who require complex care

Time : 09:30 AM

Nursing Global 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Heather MacDonald photo
Biography:

Dr. MacDonald completed a Master’s degree in Nursing at the University of Toronto, Canada and a PhD at the University of Manchester in the UK. Currently she is a Professor in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of New Brunswick (Canada). Dr. MacDonald’s doctoral work examined respite for parents who were caring for children who required complex care. This paper comes from that work. Dr. MacDonald has three children of her own.

Abstract:

Current literature states that advances in nursing and medical care and developments in pharmaceutical and health technologies have led to an increasing number of severely disabled children who require complex health care. These children who require complex care are being cared for in their homes by their parents. The purpose of this study was to better understand parents’ caregiving experiences and to explore the values, beliefs and practices that influence parents’ use and satisfaction with respite services. An ethnographic study involving 19 mothers, four fathers and four grandmothers and three grandfathers of children between the ages of eight and 16 years who required complex care and their respite providers, including 13 nurses and four social workers from three counties in Northwest England was conducted. Data were collected through in-depth interviews, participant observation and document review. The context of caring for a child with complex care needs was described and four broad themes were identified in the data. These themes include: parents caring, caring and the impact on parental identity, the nature of respite and fair play. These themes will be discussed in the presentation.

 

Keynote Forum

David C Gordon

University of Virginia School of Medicine, USA

Keynote: Thinking inside the box: Using telehealth to expand clinical education and training resources in the developing world

Time : 10: 00 AM

Nursing Global 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker David C Gordon photo
Biography:

Mr. Cattell-Gordon has worked at UVA for over two decades. He helped design, develop and implement the cancer education, support and outreach programs for the University of Virginia Clinical Cancer Center. This included developing community-based programs such as the Every Women’s Life Health Passport which won the prestigious national Profiles in Progress Award. He left UVA in 2004 to serve as Associate Director of a large social service department where he led a successful effort to secure the 2007 Virginia US Senate Productivity and Quality Award. Cattell-Gordon returned to UVA in 2008 as a faculty member in the Division of Public Health Sciences and the School of Nursing. He directs the nationally recognized UVA Telemedicine program, oversees rural network development for the UVA Health System and is the co-founder of and senior advisor to the Healthy Appalachia Institute at UVA’s College at Wise, an Appalachian-based public health institute. He is currently working with key partners in far Southwest Virginia to help shape a strategic health planning process for the region. He is also helping develop tele-core, a resource capability using telehealth technologies to improve clinical outcomes and access to clinical trials. He is also a founder of the Virginia Institute of Autism, an applied behavioral school, support program and research organization

Abstract:

Twenty years ago, University of Virginia became one of the first medical centers in the United States to see the potential of using video communications to improve access to needed healthcare, especially for rural communities. To that end, the university formed a center for telehealth to mobilize physicians, nurses, community health professionals and technologists to harness broadband and wireless technologies to deliver critical medical services to patients regardless of location. This UVA network has created access to care for thousands in rural communities throughout Virginia but also has extended the reach of health education, training and specialty care to Latin America, Africa and Southeast Asia. And with emerging globalization, the health of people in distant communities can affect the health of people everywhere. The focus of this presentation will be the current state of telehealth capabilities in providing both broadband and wireless connectivity into hard to reach communities. With the decrease cost of video-technology, the rapid expansion of cellular service and the near ubiquitous presence of cell phones, the environment for care is expanding. The speakers, with 20 years of nursing, public health and telehealth experience, will provide a primer on how to establish a telehealth program, a review of costs and technologies as well as an exploration of various clinical use cases. In particular, the speakers will review the outcomes from four successful projects that include a surgical and nurse training program with the University of Rwanda, a specialty clinic in Liberia, a mid-wife training in the DRC (PROSAMI) as well as educational and research support for projects in Uganda, Myanmar and Bangladesh. Participants will leave a broader understanding of telehealth, program design and ideas for expanding the reach of clinical services.

Nursing Global 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nam Mi Kang photo
Biography:

Nam Mi Kang has completed her PhD at Seoul National University and Post-doctoral studies at Texas Austin University School of Nursing. She is a Professor of Nursing department at Konkuk University, South Korea. She has published many papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a society Director and review member of Korean Journal of Women Health Nursing.

Abstract:

Purpose: The breast-feeding is known to have lots of advantages for infants in nutritional, protective and developmental aspects. Macronutrients of human milk (HM) were generally known and reported to be independent of most of maternal factors only except lactation period and premature delivery. However, there were significant controversies on the issue. Interestingly, maternal age and body mass index (BMI) were reported to significantly affect fat components of HM. We evaluated the association between macronutrients of human milk (HM), and interactions of maternal age and body mass index (BMI) in matched conditions.

Methods: Totally 80 HM samples were collected from healthy breast-feeding mothers at fourth lactation week. HM macronutrients and maternal data were analyzed. Mothers were sub grouped into four groups by maternal age (20s/30s) and BMI (overweight/normal). The collected samples were frozen and stored in plastic containers at -20°C. The samples were thawed at 45°C for homogenization using MIRIS® Sonicator (Miris AB, Uppsala, Sweden) and the samples were analyzed using Semisolid-state mid-infrared milk analyzer (MIRIS® Human Milk Analyzer, Miris AB, Uppsala, Sweden).

Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed significant interactions between age and BMI to affect macronutrients in HM; fat, carbohydrate, and calories. Moreover, inverse responses of fat and calorie to BMI were found in different age groups. The evaluation of over- or under-weighted infants warrants considering maternal age and BMI.

 

Conclusion: The interactions between maternal age and BMI were found to affect HM composition. Interestingly, the inverse responses of milk fat and calorie to the BMI were found in different age groups in Korean mothers. Thus, the evaluation and management of over- or under-weighted infants warrants considering maternal age and BMI. In the further studies, the effects of these interactions should be evaluated in the view of the growth of infants enrolling enough numbers of subjects in controlled maternal conditions and in the different racial groups.

 

 

  • Nursing Education, Heathcare and Management, Women Health Nursing, Nursing Management,Telemedicine and e health ,Nursing Practice
Location: Hall 1

Session Introduction

Kathleen Rindahl

California State University, Fresno, USA

Title: Student impact on health: Fresno state university mobile health program
Speaker
Biography:

Kathleen Rindahl is an Assistant Professor and Lead Faculty of Community Health course at School of Nursing, Fresno State University, California. She is a Nurse Practitioner with passion for community health and wellbeing of underserved populations. She has 10 years of Clinical experience as a Migrant Health Nurse working on a Mobile Health Unit. In addition to teaching, she also continues to practice as a Nurse Practitioner in an urgent care clinic in underserved area of Fresno.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Research has shown health disparities exist in rural populations that differ from inner cities. These dipartites include limited access to health care due to a shortage of primary providers, limited clinic facilities as well as transportation issues getting to existing clinics. Rural populations also have a higher rate of poverty, lower educational levels as well as multicultural ethic groups, which limits access to health information and information on preventative health care.

Aim: The purpose of the mobile health program has three goals; provide preventative health screenings, education and screening services to underserved populations; provide clinical training sites for nursing students; and to provide an opportunity for inter-professional collaboration among students.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The program is guided by the essential curriculum elements developed by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing as well as the core competencies for inter-professional collaborative practice set for by the inter-professional education collaborative (2011). Curriculum elements include research, policy, organization and financing of health care, ethics, professional role development and theoretical foundations of nursing practice, human diversity and social issues, as well as health promotion and disease prevention. Competencies for inter-professional collaboration include values and ethics for collaboration, roles and responsibilities, communication and teamwork.

Findings: Despite health care reform in the United States, many still do not have access to health care due to an impacted system and adequate resources. Additionally, the burden of disease and access to care is significant in both rural and urban areas of Fresno.

Conclusion & Significance: The program’s success is due to the engagement and collaborative efforts of students to provide services in rural and urban areas throughout central California. Evaluation of data continues however, statistics for the last three semesters reveal 25 site visits, 1,516 patients seen and 3,321 student service learning hours.

Speaker
Biography:

Harjinder Sandhu has been working at Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) since 2013. Over the years, she has taught in a variety of settings including laboratory, class and clinical. She has worked within the lab setting and enjoyed teaching with the high-fidelity simulators. In Jan 2017, she will be joining her lab team and taking on a new role as Simulation Facilitator. Her research project during Graduation at University of British Columbia was related to “Simulation education and how it affects the competence and confidence of nursing students in the clinical environment”. She completed her Master’s Degree in June 2012.

 

Abstract:

There is a growing need for undergraduate students to acquire quality placements for clinical practice. However, with the current state in healthcare, quality placements have been very hard to attain. Therefore, HPS have become the latest trend in many nursing schools in attempt to address this issue. In this study, HPS has been seen to help with confidence levels for clinical practice. However, the benefits that students’ take away from the simulation based learning activities is very dependent on how the simulation is organized, structured and conducted. This notion is supported by the findings of this study. A qualitative phenomenological study design using two focus groups was used. A convenience sample of students from one educational institution; University of British Columbia (UBC) in the term three, of their undergraduate nursing degree was emailed an invitation to attend a focus group session. There were six major themes and multiple sub-themes that came about during this study that impacted how students perceived their experience with HPS in relation to clinical confidence. The major themes that were evident from the participants’ experiences were classified as: Realism, building on knowledge, safe environment, critical thinking and confidence and anxiety. From this study, several conclusions can be drawn about how HPS affects undergraduate student nurses’ confidence for clinical practice. Findings indicate, it is crucial to feel that the whole simulation experience depicts reality. Realism was the major theme related to clinical confidence. If the scenario was not simulating enough participants felt, they did not learn much from them. However, during times when simulations were at the optimal level, participants felt that they acquired many things, such as confidence, clinical techniques, linking theory to practice, identifying their own knowledge gaps, critical thinking, and background knowledge to help in similar cases in the actual clinical environment. It is very important that HPS is well integrated into the nursing programs so students achieve great results from the simulations, which can be done if the simulations being conducted and organized at the right times in the programs.

Speaker
Biography:

Maud Huynen is a Research Fellow at International Centre for Integrated Assessment and Sustainable Development, Maastricht University. She holds Masters Degrees in Environmental Health Science (2001) and Epidemiology (2003), and a PhD in Global Health (2008). She has been involved in several European and Dutch projects exploring the health impacts of climate change. She is currently working on the NurSus TOOLKIT project. The aim of this project is to “Enhance the availability/relevance of a sound learning offer in Sustainability Literacy and Competency (SLC) in nurse education by developing innovative teaching and learning approaches and materials”.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Based on the moral obligation to apply a health-in-all-policies approach, it is time that health systems become more environmentally responsible and sustainable. The involvement of well-informed nurses is crucial in facilitating this transition. Insights regarding nursing experts’ view on ‘sustainability in health care’ and the integration of this topic in nurse education, however, are limited.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: We explored the perspectives on sustainability in health care among 52 European nurse educators and senior professionals, using a two-staged Delphi survey study. We assessed the most important reasons and barriers for integrating sustainability in nursing programmes. This survey also allowed for the assessment of the experts’ opinion about the most important sustainability knowledge topics and skills to be included in nurse education.

Findings: Participants associated ‘sustainability in health care’ with both sustaining health care itself and environmental sustainability. Moreover, they believed a sound definition of sustainability in health care should combine both these aspect. The participating experts clearly believed that it is important to integrate sustainability-related education throughout nursing curricula. They considered this importance in order to educate future-fit nurses; to increase environmental awareness and decrease environmental impact; to promote healthy sustainable communities; to respond to changing CSR, professional and/or educational guidelines; and to recognize our moral responsibility. Important barriers included competing curriculum demands, lack of relevant knowledge among teachers, and the current limited inclusion in nursing standards. Survey outcomes provided the top 10 sustainability related knowledge topics and the top 10 sustainability related skills, based on expert ranking.

Conclusion & Significance: With proper sustainability-related training, nurses will be able to practice to the full extent of their skills and to take significant leadership roles in sustainable health care policy, planning, and provision. Hence, efforts to develop sustainability-related education for nursing programmes need to be urgently moving forward.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Nam Mi Kang has completed her PhD at Seoul National University and Post-doctoral studies at Texas Austin University School of Nursing. She is a Professor of Nursing department at Konkuk University, South Korea. She has published many papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a society Director and review member of Korean Journal of Women Health Nursing.

Abstract:

Aim: Human milk bank is known as one of the best alternative options for sick infants including premature infants. However, only two human milk banks (HMBs) are working in Korea. In the present study, we evaluated the awareness on the HMB in Korean mothers who had infants younger than 18 months old to find out the issues that would help establishment of HMB in Korea.

Methods: The survey questionnaire was developed by a team composed with neonatologists, obstetricians, nurses, nutritionists and health care specialists. The internet survey was performed by sending emails to mothers who were registered to Maeil family members have children younger than 18 months for 864 Korean women. Totally 864 questionnaire were received among 114,469 answers and the results were analyzed.

Results: However, only 49% of subjects had awareness of the presence of HMB. Unfortunately, less than half of them could get information about HMB by official way including mass media. In addition, 76% of subjects were found not to want to use HMB. Most important reason was found as a concern on the safety of donor milk including lifestyle of donors, infection controls and possible nutritional loss of banked milk.

Conclusion: The purpose and function of HMB is not widely educated and it seems to be most important for women who has negative concept about HMB in Korea. Thus, further study is warranted with more numbers of subjects after active public education about the HMB.

Speaker
Biography:

Alaa AlBashayreh is a Lecturer of Nursing at Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat-Oman. He completed his MSc in Nursing Administration at Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid-Jordan, in 2010. His research interests include “Nursing education and mixed-method research on nursing leadership, management, preparedness, transition to practice, nurse working conditions, job outcomes, nursing sensitive indicators, healthcare quality and safety outcomes”.

Abstract:

Quality measures are central to the concept of quality improvement in healthcare and patient satisfaction with nursing care quality (PSNCQ) is considered a reliable measure for assessing and improving the overall quality of healthcare. In Oman and the Middle East, there is a lack of useful scales which can be utilized in measuring and reporting PSNCQ in an Arabic context. This absence of valid and reliable quality measures limits research and publication in this particular area. The purpose of this study is to perform transcultural adaptation and psychometric evaluation of an Arabic version of the PSNCQ questionnaire. A cross-sectional, methodological design was employed and a sample of 292 adult patients admitted in a tertiary hospital in Oman was utilized. Data were collected from January through March, 2016, using a secure online survey method. The mean score of PSNCQ was 72.3 (standard deviation 12.9). Internal consistency of the scale was satisfactory with a Cronbach's α of .96. The item-level content validity index ranged from .83 to 1, and the scale-level content validity index was .98. Evidence of construct validity was obtained (convergent and divergent validity). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a single factor solution, explaining 63.3% of the variance. Overall, this study provided a 17-item, Likert-scaled self-reporting instrument which is psychometrically sound for its content, comprehension, readability and practicality, to measure PSNCQ in an Arabic context.

 

Inderdeep Kaur

Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Khalsa College, India

Title: Awakening ‘Ajna chakra’ for soul, body and mind
Speaker
Biography:

Inderdeep Kaur is presently working as an Associate Professor in Botany at SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, India. She has travelled widely and participated in several International conferences. During personal interactions with undergrads over several years, she found them stressed due to various reasons. In a bid to help them distress, she has picked up Stress Management and Traditional Meditation Practices. She was invited to organize a workshop on stress management in Philadelphia Stress Management Summit 2015.

 

 

Abstract:

The chakra system, an ancient Indian way of viewing body divides human system into seven energy centers or chakras along the spine. To possess a healthy mind and body, energy must flow freely in these chakras. When the chakras are balanced, the whole body works in harmony and we feel elevated, energized and fit. It is essential that seven chakras which run from the base of the spine to the head in the human body stay open, aligned and fluid. In case of any blockage in this path, energy cannot flow and the body starts losing its vitality. Emotional balancing, physical well-being, and mental clarity affect how well each chakra can filter energy and the degree of this infusion will in return determine our state of mental and physical health. The simplest way to strike the balance is through chanting meditation. As each of the chakras is associated with a specific mantra in form of sound, syllable, word or group of words chanting these ‘Bija’ mantras or seed mantras is considered capable of creating transformation within one’s body and mind. In Indian traditional system, seven cleansing ‘Bija’ mantras associated with the chakras are: “LAM”-chakra 1 (root), “VAM”- chakra 2 (sacral/navel), “RAM”-chakra 3 (solar plexus), “YAM”-chakra 4 (heart), “HAM”- chakra 5 (throat), “OM”-chakra 6 (third eye/brow) and “OM”-chakra 7 (crown). The ancient Indian healing system also believes that the physical body is made up of five elements namely - earth (matter in solid form), water (matter in liquid form), fire (radiant matter, such as electricity), air (matter in gaseous form) and aakash (ether- the tiny intercellular spaces in the human body). Imbalance of these elements disrupts the immune system leading to a disease. To stay fit we need to not only keep our mind and body free of toxins but also our soul tranquil. We can achieve this by connecting one part of the body with another in a particular manner through mudras. If a communication is established between chakras and mudras, a sustainable and harmonious flow of energy in the body is maintained. According to hastha yoga, each of our fingers relates to the energy of one of five elements of which our physical body is made, and also to the chakra associated with that element. The joining of fingers in a specific manner creates positive effect on the human body. When a finger representing an element is brought into contact with the thumb, that element is brought into balance and body makes an attempt to fight the disease. Mudras start electromagnetic currents within the body which balance various constituting elements and restore health.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Alice Khachian is an Assistant Professor and Faculty Member at Iran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. She completed her Under-graduate and Master studies in Nursing at Esfahan University of Medical Sciences as Medical Surgical Nursing Instructor. She has been involved in nursing education since 1997 at Iran University of Medical Sciences as Faculty Member and she completed her PhD Nursing Education in 2012. Her professional activities are based on Clinical Education, Orthopedic Nursing, Nursing Education and Management. She is also a member of Academic Consultant Committee, member of Nursing Organization of Iran as Scientific Consultant.

Abstract:

Background & Aim: Nurses are the largest and most important human resource for health care organizations, community health promotion is important. The healthcare system, especially the members of the nurses who are active in completely different culture conditions is of utmost importance. Professional nursing is one of the factors involved in the professional, cultural and organizational commitment. Strong and positive culture in the organization can accept nurses to better interact with colleagues and ultimately provide satisfaction in completing tasks and organizational objectives to be followed. The success of the organization depends on the members and staff. Recently, researchers believe that professional commitment and organizational structures necessarily are contradictory and are not incompatible, but can significantly correlate with each other. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nurse’s professional behavior and organizational culture and commitment in hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences.

Method: This study was a cross-sectional descriptive correlation that aims to give community nurses in the hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. In this study, after obtaining the necessary and ethical permits, stratified samplings with proportional allocation of qualified nurses (200 nurses) were selected. For the study of four self-constructed questionnaire on demographic data, Goz professional behavior, organizational culture and organizational commitment of Allen and Meyer were used. The questionnaire was completed by nurses to self-report method and duration of response to the questionnaires was about 20-30 minutes, the nurses were empowered to complete the questionnaire within 48 hours and returned to the researcher. After collecting the data and data entry into SPSS version 21 were analyzed. In order to achieve specific objectives and answer the research questions, descriptive statistics such as mean and standard tables and the central indices of dispersion such as standard deviation and Pearson correlation test was used.

Results: Professional nurses’ mean score 108/98±17/41, organizational culture mean’ score 42/56±17/32 and organizational commitment 97/94±8/66 was obtained. Between professional behavior and organizational culture, there was no significant relationship (p-value=0/706) and only subscale attention to detail and professional behavior was obtained as there was a direct relationship between statistical significance (p-value=0/032). There was no significant relationship between professional behavior and organizational commitment (p-value=0/152) and statistically significant relationship was directly observed only between the normative and professional behavior (p-value=0/007).

Conclusion: As a conclusion, nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences did not show statistically significant relationship between professional behavior, organizational culture and commitment.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Peijia Zha has her passion in “Health disparity research and the provision of high quality health care to underserved urban communities”. She has experience in “Creating and assessing tools used to measure intervention effectiveness”. Additionally, she has taken part in developing research designs and integrating professionals from diverse fields to accomplish studies requiring interdisciplinary collaboration. Her specific areas of expertise include “Development of sophisticated problem solving statistical methodologies, design applications of multivariate analysis approaches and conducting program evaluations based on sound and feasible evaluation models”.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Hypertension is the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke. Monitoring and self-management are important components of effective chronic disease care and improving patient outcomes. With the rapid development of integration of mobile health technology (mHealth) into health care delivery services, mHealth intervention provides a great opportunity to improve the efficiency of chronic disease management. This study utilized a pilot study to assess the preliminary effectiveness of a mobile-based health intervention in an urban underserved community with a high incidence of hypertension. The study hypothesized that patients with hypertension would yield different outcomes because of the use of the mHealth application compared with patients who were not using the application.

Methodology: A six-month randomized controlled trial was utilized to examine blood pressure (BP) decline and BP maintenance with 32 participants assigned either to standard care (the standard follow-up group) and treatment or to the standard care plus mHealth (the mHealth group). Repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVA) were used to compare all baseline data and changes from the baseline to three months and six months.

Results: The preliminary results showed that the mHealth group’s mean systolic blood pressure is (on average) 6.1 mmHg lower than in the standard followed-up group (p=0.04) after six-month intervention. No significant differences were found in mean diastolic blood pressure (p=0.82) after the intervention. In addition, the results revealed no main effect for time (p=0.47).

Conclusion & Significance: The results of this study provide some support for the use of mHealth application to help hypertension monitoring and self-management. It demonstrates the feasibility of incorporating chronic disease monitoring and self-management into existing mHealth applications. In addition, this study can advance the understanding of mHealth interventions for underserved population and provides evidence to support the new health care delivery approach in underserved urban communities.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Elke Jones Zschaebitz, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, has served as adjunct faculty in the FNP program at Georgetown since 2013.  She has been an NP since 1998, initially working in Germany for nine years with the Department of Defense.  During that time, she discovered her love of teaching, working with programs such as Student2Student (S2S) for which she received a national award for innovation and excellence in mentoring high school students within the Department of Defense educational network. Elke returned to the states in 2007 and was appointed as an assistant professor at the University of Virginia (UVA) School of Nursing. She continued her academic work in 2010 serving as faculty at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing to help improve their preceptorship program.  While at UVA, she received an innovative teaching award in 2010 for her program promoting cultural competence and ensuring preceptorship immersion in the coalfield region in Southern Appalachia.  She also served as faculty for the Healthy Appalachia Institute, a public health institute at UVA’s College at Wise.Elke’s clinical practice experience includes work with the Wilkinson Pediatric Clinic at Ft. Lee, Planned Parenthood of the Blue Ridge in Charlottesville, the Minute Clinics of Richmond, the High Risk Breast and Ovarian Clinic at UVA and in an integrated clinic called Thrive Health Care serving the LGBT community as well as those with complex physical and mental health conditions. She currently practices as a family nurse practitioner at the UVA Elson Student Health Center in Charlottesville, VA.  In addition she serves as a volunteer at the Charlottesville Free Clinic precepting FNP and medical students in a community-based interdisciplinary program. 

 

Abstract:

Twenty years ago, The University of Virginia became one of the first medical centers in the United States to see the potential of using video communications to improve access to needed healthcare, especially for rural communities. To that end, the University formed a Center for Telehealth to mobilize physicians, nurses, community health professionals and technologists to harness broadband and wireless technologies to deliver critical medical services to patients regardless of location. This UVA Network has created access to care for thousands in rural communities throughout Virginia but also has extended the reach of health education, training and specialty care to Latin America, Africa and Southeast Asia. And with emerging globalization, the health of people in distant communities can affect the health of people everywhere.

The focus of this presentation will be the current state of telehealth capabilities in providing both broadband and wireless connectivity into hard to reach communities. With the decrease cost of video-technology, the rapid expansion of cellular service and the near ubiquitous presence of cell phones, the environment for care is expanding. The speakers, with 20 years of nursing, public health and telehealth experience, will provide a primer on how to establish a telehealth program, a review of costs and technologies as well as an exploration of various clinical use cases.

In particular, the speakers will review the outcomes from four successful projects that include a surgical and nurse training program with the University of Rwanda, a specialty clinic in Liberia, a mid-wife training in the DRC (PROSAMI) as well as educational and research support for projects in Uganda, Myanmar and Bangladesh.Participants will leave will a broader understanding of telehealth, program design and ideas for expanding the reach of clinical services.

Mary B Haule

Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Tanzania

Title: Experience of cancer nursing in Tanzania
Biography:

Mary B. Haule, RN, BScN, Student MscPalliative care

Abstract:

Oncology nursing has not given priority in Tanzania. This has led to inadequate care to cancer patients admitted in the hospitals from primary level. Lack of knowledge and skills can results misunderstanding between nurses and relative who need more information on patient progress. Currently, there is no nurse who has specialization in oncology nursing; there is no undergraduate and postgraduate course in oncology in East Africa; and moreover, there is limited fund for sponsorship. Nurses need to have basic knowledge of cancer disease, treatment and supportive care so as to improve quality of care. Oncology nursing is crucial in cancer centers or any hospital which provide cancer treatment, so as to improve care to patients. Nurses spent most of the time with patients; therefore, we need to equip them with knowledge and skills in oncology nursing. International collaboration of nurses is vital to build capacity in cancer care.

Conclusion and Recommendation

Oncology nursing is crucial in Cancer centers  or any hospital which provide cancer treatment, so as to improve care to patients. Nurses spent most of the time with patients; therefore we need to equip them with knowledge and skills in oncology nursing. International collaboration of nurses is vital so to build capacity in cancer care

 

Speaker
Biography:

Ben Appleby is a NMC registered Nurse Tutor and Senior Lecturer at Birmingham City University and qualified from City University London and St Bartholomew’s School of Nursing and Midwifery in September 1998, with a degree in Nursing and Human Science. He has gone on to practice in Cardiology, Coronary Care and Cardiac Rehabilitation and completed a Master’s degree in Nursing Research in 2003 from Kings College London, and a PhD this year from University Birmingham. My main research interest is understanding intentional behaviour when implementing guidelines in clinical practice. Teaching practice focuses on evidence based practice, research methodology and acute nursing practice.

 

Abstract:

Background: Trying to get research and products of research into clinical practice is an enduring problem. A clearer picture is emerging as to how individual practitioners respond toward practical problems of changing clinical practice, but this does not include health professionals’ intentions to use products of research and what influences their intentions.

Aim: Aim of this study is to explore health professionals’ intentional behavior and what determines their intention to use products of research in clinical practice.

Design: Systematic review and narrative synthesis. Data sources: Five databases were searched systematically. This included BNI, HMIC, Psych INFO, CINHAL and MEDLINE; articles published in only English language were included.

Review Methods: PRISMA guidelines were used as a framework for structuring the review and methods of narrative synthesis to analyze study outcomes.

Results: 18 studies matched the final inclusion criteria. All studies used questionnaires to measure intention. Most studies involved nurses or physicians. Nurses’ intentions were mostly influenced by their perceived ability to use guidelines in their practice. Physicians’ intentions were often influenced by their perceptions of the usefulness and relevance of the guideline and peer pressure among the professional group. Practice habits, when added to intentional models were also predictive of intentional behavior. In studies that compared intentions with behavior, the level of intention often did not match self-report or actual behavior.